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NLM’s History of Medicine Division Launches a New Blog Featuring the Historical Collections of the World’s Largest Biomedical Library

From the National Library of Medicine:

The NLM’s History of Medicine Division has launched a new blog, Circulating Now, to encourage greater exploration and discovery of one of the world’s largest and most treasured history of medicine collections. Encompassing millions of items that span ten centuries, these collections include items in just about every form one can imagine—from books, journals, and photographs, to lantern slides, motion picture films, film strips, video tapes, audio recordings, pamphlets, ephemera, portraits, woodcuts, engravings, etchings, and lithographs. The NLM’s historical collections also include items from the present day: born-digital materials and rich data sets—like the millions of records in its IndexCat database—that are ripe for exploration through traditional research methods and new ones that are emerging in the current climate of “big data” and the digital humanities.

Circulating Now will bring the NLM’s diverse historical collections to life in new and exciting ways for researchers, educators, students, and anyone else who is interested in the history of medicine. Whether you are familiar with NLM’s historical collections, or you are discovering them for the first time, Circulating Now will be an exciting and engaging resource to bookmark, share, and discuss with other readers.

Kicking off Circulating Now will be a series of posts that draws on the NLM’s historical collections and associated others to reenact in a unique way a tumultuous event in medical and American history which occurred 132 years ago this summer: the assassination of, and attempts to save, our nation’s 20th President, James A. Garfield.

The National Library of Medicine (http://www.nlm.nih.gov) is the world’s largest library of the health sciences and a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (http://www.nih.gov). NLM collects, organizes, and makes available biomedical science information to scientists, health professionals, and the public.

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