Educator's Toolbox
Curriculum for Educators

    Facilitating Discussions 101
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 9/25/2017
    Time: 5:30pm – 6:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Teaching through discussion rather than lecture presents unique set of opportunities and challenges for instructors. This workshop explores the power of discussion as a teaching tool and offers advice on strategies for incorporating discussion into in small, medium or large course environments.

      This experiential workshop will assist instructors in setting expectations for student preparation and involvement, developing a strategy for initiating conversations, and skills for sustaining and advancing a discussion. Participants will practice developing questions that launch productive discussions, effectives responses for probing responses and a sampling of discussion techniques for small or large groups.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Identify two ways to initiative a discussion in class
      • Describe key characteristics of good discussion questions
      • Explain two techniques for engaging learners in discussion


    Not Another Test! Beyond High Stakes Testing
    Date: 9/26/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This session will demonstrate how no-stakes assessment used in class or as a low-stakes assignment can facilitate student self-regulation, retention of information and inform your instruction in real time. Many of us wonder just how much our students know or have retained from our lectures or the assigned work that is often necessary to understand the new information you are about to teach. We will explore some simple evidence-based teaching and student engagement strategies that will help you understand what you need to do differently in an upcoming class session and right on the spot as you are teaching. This can be particularly helpful in large classes but is also a valuable technique in any learning environment. A sampling of technologies will be discussed for this purpose including Nearpod, VoiceThread and Collaborate Ultra.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Understand the purposes of and differences between formative and summative assessments
      • Describe multiple formative assessment options for use in their courses
      • Create at least one formative assessment for immediate use in one or more courses


    The Active Learning Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 9/28/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      The large lecture presents a number of challenges to experienced and novice instructors alike. This workshop explores some of the challenges (and assumptions we make about what can or cannot happen in a large lecture) and describes a number of techniques to assist faculty transition from the “sage on the stage” to a “guide on the side.”

      This interactive workshop will:
      • describe benefits and challenges associated with a traditional lecture model
      • explore instructor and student assumptions about large enrollment courses
      • identify potential engaged learning activities for the large lecture courses
      • demonstrate a handful of techniques to enhance large lecture courses


    Communicate Like a Pro---Think Like a Radio Host: Find Your Voice
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 10/5/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

      These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

      Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.

      Communicate Like a Pro: Think Like a Radio Host: Find Your Voice

      Fans of WKRP in Cincinnati and News Radio probably had a favorite personality from the fictionalized radio stations. For me, it was Les Nesman (“Oh, the humanity.”) and Bill McNeal (played by Phil Hartmann). Each of the radio hosts capitalized on their voice to delivery news, information and “gripping” music (a la Dr. Jonny Fever) to the listeners. As presenters, we must cultivate a signature style that addresses the speaker’s authenticity and vocal capabilities. This workshop encourages participants to reflect on the signature’s authentic speaking style they would like to cultivate experiment with simple techniques to add more energy, variety and interest to their voice.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
      • Describe the concepts of a “signature” style
      • Identify the importance of vocal variety in communication settings
      • Apply at last two techniques to improve vocal variety


    The New Science of Learning: Strategies and Applications Designed to Facilitate Student Learning
    Instructor: Todd Zakrajsek, PhD
    Date: 10/6/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Kanbar Performance Space, Kanbar Campus Center, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This session focuses on the major points of the book "New Science of Learning" (co-authored with Terry Doyle) with attendees working through some ways to apply these concepts in just about any class.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Explain how at least three physiological mechanisms impact learning
      2) Include information about growth mindedness into any classroom
      3) Encourage students to develop a better understanding of their own learning

      Todd Zakrajsek is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Associate Director of the Faculty Development Fellowship at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Dr. Zakrajsek is also an Adjunct Associate Professor of Faculty Development in the College of Veterinary Medicine at North Carolina State University. His current academic work and publications pertain to faculty development, effective instructional strategies, and student learning.


    Motivating and Engaging Students in the Classroom: Advancing the Understanding and Applications of How Students Learn
    Instructor: Todd Zakrajsek, PhD
    Date: 10/6/2017
    Time: 10:30am – 12:00pm
    Location: Kanbar Performance Space, Kanbar Campus Center - East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)


      This session will demonstrate common aspects of all learning, and how to use those concepts to motivate and engage students as they acquire new skills and knowledge. Included will be rethinking some current educational trends with an emphasis on what aspects of these trends will likely hold up, and which trends are likely to falter. The emphasis will be on applications that can be quickly put to use.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Describe the current understanding of the effectiveness of lectures relative to active learning
      2) Explain the critical aspects of a Flipped Classroom approach
      3) Apply at least one new teaching strategy to better engage students in the classroom

      Todd Zakrajsek is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Associate Director of the Faculty Development Fellowship at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Dr. Zakrajsek is also an Adjunct Associate Professor of Faculty Development in the College of Veterinary Medicine at North Carolina State University. His current academic work and publications pertain to faculty development, effective instructional strategies, and student learning.


    Feedback for Improved Learning & Performance
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 10/10/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Feedback is an invaluable tool for learners to improve their skills and abilities. This workshop explores the importance of both formal and informal feedback in the learning environment. Participants will explore different means for sharing feedback with learners, key characteristics of effective feedback. Through a series of hands-on exercises and case vignettes, attendees will apply the characteristics of effective feedback to a variety of scenarios, including student written work, class discussions and poor exam performance.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Articulate the role of feedback to improve learning and performance
      • Describe the difference between informal and formal feedback
      • Apply principles of effective feedback


    A Novel Method to Publish Your Educational Scholarship and Work: MedEDPortal!
    Instructor: Nethra Ankam, MD
    Date: 10/17/2017
    Time: 8:00am – 9:00am
    Location: Bluemle Life Sciences Building, Room 107 - Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      MedEdPORTAL Publications is a free publication service provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in partnership with the American Dental Education Association. MedEDPORTAL Publications maintains a rigorous peer review process based on standards used in the scholarly publishing community. MedEdPORTAL offers educators tutorials, virtual patients, simulation cases, lab guides, video podcasts, assessment tools, and other resources to

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify MedEdPORTAL’s suite of services
      2) Describe submission standards and posting processes for MedEdPORTAL
      3) Review and discuss educational tools pertaining to MedEdPORTAL submissions
      4) Demonstrate navigating MedEdPORTAL’s live site


    ADHD in Your Classroom - What Is It And How To Recognize And Teach These Students With Empathy And Effectiveness
    Date: 10/17/2017
    Time: 3:30pm – 4:30pm
    Location: Paul Gutman LIbrary, Instruction Space, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Students with ADHD or ADD have unique challenges that may affect their abilities to regulate their behavior, resist impulses and/or accomplish tasks efficiently. ADHD/ADD is a physiological disorder of the brain with definite, predictable behavioral consequences. Participants will be exposed to practical interventions aimed to improving learning and behavior in college classrooms. This workshop will provide an overview of ADHD/ADD and explore how college educators can support students in learning to successfully manage challenges present in their classrooms.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
      1) Understand the symptoms, characteristics and treatment of ADD/ADHD
      2) Discuss the role of self-regulation as well as habit/skill building
      3) Develop strategies to use within the classroom to address the behavioral and academic needs of ADHD students.
      4) Understand how APPs, tools and platforms may assist students with ADHD


    Improving Assessment with ExamSoft
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 10/18/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      ExamSoft is not just a secure delivery solution – it has the potential to improve teaching and learning exponentially! This workshop, which focuses on the feedback and analysis features of ExamSoft, is essential for item writers, course faculty, and administration.

      Topics will include:

      1) Student Feedback reports
      2) Self-directed learning
      3) Early advising/remediation
      4) Item analysis
      5) Curricular goals and objectives


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Mime: Use Nonverbal Communication
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 10/19/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

      These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

      Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.

      Communicate Like a Pro: Think Like a Mime: Use Nonverbal Communication

      Mimes tell stories without making a sound. Mimes know how to use their bodies and their facial expressions to convey emotion and advance a story. Effective public speakers do not need the skill or expertise of a mime to harness their bodies potential for communicating ideas. Speakers simply need to be aware of nonverbal communication, its potential to impact the audience perception and practice at using the body to convey a message. This workshop focuses on key elements of nonverbal communication, such as eye contact, stance, hand gestures and facial expression to deliver more effective messages with more. Participants should prepare for an introductory round of charades!

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
      • Discuss the importance of nonverbal communication
      • Describe two primary components of nonverbal communication
      • Apply at last two techniques to improve nonverbal communication


    OrciD, Scopus, and Google Scholar, Oh My! – As You Walk the Road of Research, These Can Help Track Your Journey
    Instructor: Daniel Verbit, MS
    Date: 10/23/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Paul Gutman Library, Instruction Space, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      There are a variety of identifiers that are out there, some that you create for yourself and others that companies create for you. This workshop will go over the basics and help you set up accounts and link your IDs to your published research. For best results please bring your laptop and digital CV.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Understand the value of claiming and knowing your unique identifiers
      2) Locate various online unique identifiers
      3) Compile a digital account of existing scholarship
      4) Develop a plan for future updates


    A Look at Online and Hybrid/Blended Course (Re-)Design and the Student Experience
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 10/24/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Not all courses are created equal. This session will focus on course design in online and blended/hybrid courses and the impact it has on the student experience. Evidence-based practices will be shared with participants and examples of different, yet effective, course designs. The presentation will showcase at least one before and after example of a course re-design that will be shared by the presenter and a course instructor.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Explain how course design can negatively and positively impact the student experience in online and hybrid/blended courses
      • Identify two – three features of various course designs presented that they would consider incorporating in a current or future online or hybrid/blended course


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like an Advertiser: Grab and Keep Attention & Close the Deal
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 11/2/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

      These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

      Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.

      Communicate Like a Pro--Think Think an Advertiser: Grab and Keep Attention & Close the Deal

      Some estimates suggest that we are exposed to thousands of advertisements in a day. In order to compete, an advertisement must grab the viewer’s attention and convince people to act in some way. Similarly, speakers must capture and maintain the audience’s attention and more importantly move people to action, even if the action is to seek additional information or to inspire behavioral change. This workshop focuses on the importance of keeping and maintaining and audience’s attention, specifically as it applies to introductory and concluding remarks. Participants will explore several techniques to grab the audience’s attention, create relevancy, and issue the call to action.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
      • Articulate the importance of introductory remarks in a communicative exchange
      • Articulate the importance of concluding remarks in a communicative exchange
      • Apply at last two techniques to grab and maintain the audience’s attention


    Electronic Portfolios for Academic Programs and Career Success
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 11/7/2017
    Time: 5:30pm – 6:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      The fields of art, architecture and engineering have long used portfolio’s as a way for both students – and professionals – to show case their work. Not unexpectedly, these physical portfolios have found their way onto the digital world and are often called e-portfolios. Whether physical or electronic this tool for show casing a person’s skills and experience is valuable. Both to the learner as evidence of their accomplishments and as a tool to help them stand out as a better candidate in the hiring process. Portfolios can also play an important role in the professional development of a student. Specific course projects that meet academic objectives can be reflected on, solidifying the students understanding of concepts and the skills they’ve mastered.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
      • Identify how portfolios can be used in the academic program to track student progress and mastery of skills
      • Observe a demonstration of sample portfolios in Jefferson’s portfolio product, Portfolium
      • Identify which assignments in your course would be appropriate for showcasing student achievement in a portfolio


    Teaching and Learning Online: A Dive into the Unknown
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 11/7/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This session will take a dive into the uniqueness of the fully online learning environment and what that means for instructors and students. Current research, evidence-based practices and tips and tricks will be shared with participants. In this session we will review, in part, the role of online course structure, communication and engagement in student satisfaction and success. Please join us if you are thinking about moving a course online at some point, are currently teaching online or simply want to learn more about online teaching and learning.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Describe the current evidence-based research on online teaching and student satisfaction
      • Describe and conceptualize one or more strategies in their current or future online teaching practices


    Experimenting Team-Building Strategies in an Innovative Nexus Learning Capstone Course
    Instructor: Gulbin Ozcan-Deniz
    Date: 11/7/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Gutman Library, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)


      This proposal aims to analyze team-building and collaborative working problems by re-designing the Construction Capstone Course at Philadelphia University. Currently, the course does not support teamwork and fulfill what students expect from a capstone course, which should be a culminating learning experience. Capstone is re-designed as an active and collaborative course with team-building activities around a real construction project. The presentation will include the re-design steps, the details of the course delivery methods, and student assessment results. The results include the background, characteristics, and dynamics that contribute to team-working as well as the success of team-based and peer learning strategies.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Understand the processes and dynamics that contribute to team working and team success
      2) Learn how to implement teamwork as an effective teaching tool
      3) Determine digital tools for collaboration


    Experimenting Team-Building Strategies in an Innovative Nexus Learning Capstone Course
    Instructor: Gulbin Ozcan-Deniz
    Date: 11/7/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Paul Gutman Library, Instruction Space
    (Register for this session)

      This proposal aims to analyze team-building and collaborative working problems by re-designing the Construction Capstone Course at Philadelphia University. Currently, the course does not support teamwork and fulfill what students expect from a capstone course, which should be a culminating learning experience. Capstone is re-designed as an active and collaborative course with team-building activities around a real construction project. The presentation will include the re-design steps, the details of the course delivery methods, and student assessment results. The results include the background, characteristics, and dynamics that contribute to team-working as well as the success of team-based and peer learning strategies.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
      1) Understand the processes and dynamics that contribute to team working and team success
      2) Learn how to implement team work as an effective teaching tool
      3) Determine digital tools for collaboration


    Engaging Students and Facilitating Interaction Using VoiceThread
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 11/14/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      VoiceThread is a multimedia tool for learner engagement and interaction across learning environments. The technology makes it easy to record and annotate slides, encourage asynchronous discussion and track student participation. Join us in this session to learn more and hear about faculty experiences with VT in across learning environments.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
      • Understand the use of VT as one of many active learning strategies
      • Describe possibilities for incorporating VT to increase student engagement and interaction, present content and assess students
      • Plan one or more VT activities for use in a course.


    Introduction to High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder in College Students
    Instructor: Kristin Swoszowski-Tran, PhD
    Date: 11/14/2017
    Time: 3:30pm – 4:30pm
    Location: Paul Gutman Library, Instruction Space, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This workshop will provide an overview of high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and discuss the challenges that students with high-functioning ASD face on a daily basis on college campuses. Participants will be exposed to materials aimed to help them better understand how people with ASD process emotions, sensory input, stress, and academic environments. Workshop participants will learn more about ASD in both women and men. By the end of the workshop, participants will develop knowledge to prepare them to better recognize, teach, and empathize with students with ASD in their classrooms.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
      1) Identify the 3 areas of impairment associated with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD)
      2) Identify the learning characteristics of college students with high-functioning ASD
      3) Use the information about learning characteristics to inform how their classrooms and interactions with students with ASD could become more supportive
      4) Identify myths associated with ASD and respond to those myths with facts they have learned in the presentation


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like an Athlete: Harness the Power of Practice
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 11/16/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

      These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

      Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.
      Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like an Athlete: Harness the Power of Practice

      Serious runners (not just professionals) incorporate a number of strategies to achieve their personal bests, including short runs, long runs, internal training, strength conditioning and nutrition. Practice for public presentations should adopt a similar strategy and the workshops included in this series offer drills to improve specific aspects of one’s communication skills. This workshop focuses on putting the pieces together and offers a perspective on practice that highlights the importance of speaking aids, “chunking” and ‘distributed practice.”

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
      • Describe the importance of practice in creating effective presentations
      • Define different methods of preparation
      • Apply at last two techniques to facilitate effective practice for a public presentation


    Creating & Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 11/28/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This session will focus on communication and community building in fully online learning environments. The perceived lack of student-student and student-instructor interactions remains a fear for instructors and students new to online teaching and learning. In this session, participants will learn some tips and tricks for creating and maintaining communication and building a sense of community in their courses. The Community of Inquiry (CoI) Framework will be discussed as one method for understanding the value of Social Presence in this learning environment. Additionally, participants will hear from an instructor who made modifications to a course that proved beneficial for all.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
      • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
      • Identify some readily available tools and strategies for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions in their current courses


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Designer: Create an Impact with Visuals
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 11/30/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

      These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

      Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.

      Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Designer: Create an Impact with Visuals

      Visuals matter. Designers understand the importance of aesthetics and how to use visual elements to set a tone or elicit a response. Communicators could benefit from borrowing a few design principles to improve the now ubiquitous PowerPoint (PPT) presentation, This workshop focuses on a handful of design principles that will elevate the look and feel of PPT presentations to make the message pop. Participants will apply the highlighted design principles to a selection of PPT slides to evaluate the good, bad, ugly and possible fixes.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
      • Discuss the importance of visually appealing materials that complement a presentation
      • Identify key design considerations in preparing visual materials
      • Identify common errors in PPT design


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Race Car Driver: Respond on the Fly (to Q& A)
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 12/7/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

      These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

      Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.


      Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Race Car Driver: Respond on the Fly (to Q& A)

      A casual observer of a FormulaOne or NASCAR event has witnessed decision-making that takes place in milliseconds and can change the outcome of the race. Professional drivers must plan for and be prepared to act in the face of the “unknown” as it unfolds. Similarly, good communicators plan and prepare for the “unknown” of a Q&A session. Speakers can anticipate and prepare for likely questions in advance by carefully analyzing points of disagreement or contention or through consideration of the audience and its key concerns. This workshop focuses on the dreaded Q&A session and provides tips and techniques for successfully navigating the final minutes of a communication experience.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
      1. Discuss the role and function of a Q&A session in professional settings
      2. Develop a plan for facilitating an effective Q&A session
      3. Apply at least two techniques for responding to the Q&A session


    Reflection as a Tool for Teaching and Learning
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 12/12/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Cemter City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This session will focus on the use of student reflection as one method for deepening their understanding of course content (Mezirow, 1997). "Critical reflection is the means by which we work through beliefs and assumptions, assessing their validity in the light of new experiences or knowledge, considering their sources, and examining underlying premises" (Cranton, 2002, p. 65). Strategies for reflective practice will be discussed and will include the use of a private journal (communication between instructor and student only), Wiki, reflective written assignments and other related activities. Join the discussion and learn how to incorporative this valuable evidence-based practice in one or more of your courses to benefit your students and gain a better understanding of their thought processes.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Discuss the value of student reflection as a potential strategy for facilitating deeper learning
      • Develop a tentative plan for incorporating reflective activities for one or more courses
      • Select one tool for consideration for one or more reflective assignments


    Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 12/14/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      The Center for Teaching & Learning presents iCE: interactive Curricula Experience Platform & App. A web-based platform and iPad app, iCE delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

      Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

      This new learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university. Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops.The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.
      In this workshop, participants will:

      1) Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video, and other course artifacts)
      2) Organize Objects into Topics
      3) Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
      4) Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course


    Introduction to Adult Learning and its Application to the Health Professions
    Instructor: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
    Date: 12/15/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Bluemle Life Sciences Building, Room 101-Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Active learning has received considerable attention over the past several years. It is defined as any instructional method that engages learners in the learning process, requiring learners to partake in meaningful learning activities and think about what they are doing. Active learning has the potential to promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of course content.

      This session will challenge some commonly held assumptions about learning, and discuss some of the research in the area of cognitive psychology, education, and physiology that hold direct implications for teaching in the health professions. In addition, a number of easily adaptable classroom activities will be used during the session.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Describe theoretical principles to teaching students in the health professions
      2) Define adult learning; active learning; and passive learning
      3) Identify various instructional styles to achieve effective learning outcomes for learners in the health professions


    Creating a Welcome Video for Your Course
    Instructors: Sherri Place, MS; May Truong-Merritt, MS
    Date: 1/3/2018
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Online Course - https://philau.zoom.us/j/153458108
    (Register for this session)

      Creating a Welcome Video for your course provides students with a sense of community and instructor presence. In this session, we’ll take a look at best practices for Welcome Video development and explore a quick and easy screen recording tool to help you create an engaging video.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify the key components to include in a Welcome Video
      2) Develop an action plan to create a short video
      3) Navigate and use the Screencast-O-Matic tool for video creation


    Using Multiple Methods for Teaching and Engaging & Assessing Students
    Instructors: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD; Jennifer Fogerty, MSEd
    Date: 1/10/2018
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This session consists of an overview of evidence-based practices for presenting content, engaging students with the content and assessing student learning using a variety of methods and materials (with and without technology). Most of these practices can be utilized in any learning environment, but we will first consider the goals and objectives for the course or task when determining the ‘best fit’. Participants will be asked to bring a copy of a current syllabus for use in the session discussions and for conceptualizing changes in their course.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Describe the rationale for using multiple methods of presentation, engagement and assessment in their teaching
      • Describe at least one learning goal for their course
      • Identify one alternate presentation, engagement activity and assessment method to meet the learning goal


    Creating a Structure to Support Your Students
    Instructors: Sherri Place, MS; May Truong-Merritt, MS
    Date: 1/10/2018
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Online Course - https://philau.zoom.us/j/950250662
    (Register for this session)

      Students benefit from a framework, or scaffold, that supports their construction of knowledge. One strategy for supporting your learners is to use tools such as Blackboard to organize content and highlight critical features. Another strategy is to create activities that give students opportunities to practice skills or the application of concepts in multiple ways. In this workshop, we’ll explore both strategies and begin creating supports for your learners.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Organize course content into chunks
      2) Edit Blackboard content to include text, images, and video
      3) Identify activities that build on each other
      4) Sequence activities to best support students as they master concepts or skills


    Improve Your Bedside Teaching: Facilitating Education in the Clinical Learning Environment
    Instructor: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
    Date: 1/12/2018
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Eakins Lounge, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      We have all experienced the challenges of teaching in the clinical learning environment (CLE). Whether dealing with time constraints, patient satisfaction scores, clinical efficiency, or precepting learners at varied levels of training, being an effective bedside teacher is not an easy feat. This workshop will facilitate a discussion on which practices will assist us in providing the highest quality patient care in the midst of teaching learners in the CLE.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Define the benefits of effective bedside teaching
      2) Identify challenges to teaching at the bedside
      3) Relate various modalities to teach learners at different stages of training at the bedside
      4) Consider the experience of the patient and family during the teaching session


    Active Teaching, Engaging Minds
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 1/17/2018
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Active teaching is an umbrella term used to identify a variety of teaching strategies. It includes most anything that students do in a classroom other than passively listening to an instructor’s lecture. Research demonstrates active learning improves students' understanding and retention of information and can be very effective in developing higher order cognitive skills such as problem solving and critical thinking. Active learning, however, presents challenges and requires re-thinking the classroom space and traditional roles.

      This interactive workshop will:
      • summarize the impact of active teaching on student learning
      • demonstrate a handful of active teaching strategies
      • discuss some challenges to adopting active teaching techniques


    Giving Effective Feedback
    Instructor: Robin Naples, MD
    Date: 1/19/2018
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Bluemle Life Sciences Building, Room 101, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Feedback is an essential component of the educational experience and growth of learners. Delivering feedback that is effective, both for the struggling learner as well as for the exceptional one, can be very challenging. When you add on the fact that setting and delivery of the feedback can be as important as the content itself, it seems an act of futility to attempt to give feedback in our hectic clinical environment. In this session, I will be discussing the feedback continuum and provide useful tips to giving effective feedback to your learners based on best practices found in both the medical and business fields.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Differentiate between coaching, formative feedback and summative feedback
      2) Understand when each is best used
      3) Recognize the barriers to giving effective feedback
      4) Employ best practice techniques to deliver effective feedback


    Weekly Spring Semester Reading and Implementation Group: Diversity, Inclusivity and Social Justice in the Classroom and on Campus
    Instructor: Susan Frosten, MArch
    Date: 1/22/2018
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Kanbar Campus Center, Room 106, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Mondays (beginning January 22; ending April 23, 2018)

      This reading and implementation group will read a book centric to diversity, social justice, and inclusivity issues in the classroom and on campus. Additional selected readings and viewings, and weekly discussions will allow participants to reflect, learn, and implement strategies to enhance a safe and respectful learning environment while fostering honest and mindful discussion between your students and you.


    Weekly Spring Semester Reading and Implementation Group: Energizing the College Classroom with the Science of Emotion
    Instructor: Anne Bower, PhD
    Date: 1/23/2018
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Kanbar Campus Center, Room 302, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Tuesdays (beginning January 23; ending April 10, 2018)

      Committing to every Tuesday in the spring semester, a group of faculty and staff congregate over free lunch to discuss and implement strategies from Sarah Rose Cavanagh’s "The Spark of Learning: Energizing the College Classroom with the Science of Emotion". Participants implement teaching and learning strategies in their current courses and report back to the group regarding observations and outcomes.


    Strategies for Giving Students Meaningful Feedback
    Instructors: Sherri Place, MS; May Truong-Merritt, MS
    Date: 1/24/2018
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Online Course - https://philau.zoom.us/j/853932791
    (Register for this session)

      What kinds of feedback help the learning process? In this workshop, we’ll explore ways to set the stage for meaningful feedback. We’ll discuss creating forward-looking assessments, establishing clear performance criteria, adding opportunities for self-assessment, and providing actionable feedback.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify forward-looking assessments
      2) Define criteria and standards for assessments
      3) Identify opportunities for self-assessment activities
      4) Identify strategies for employing frequent, immediate, criteria-based feedback


    Teaching and Supporting International Students and Other ESL Learners
    Instructor: James Dyksen, MSEd-TESOL
    Date: 1/25/2018
    Time: 11:00am – 12:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      International students and other students for whom English is a second language face a unique set of challenges and issues as they adjust to study in the degree programs at Jefferson, and, in many cases, to living in the US for the first time. This workshop will elicit faculty experiences teaching and working with ESL learners, including both concerns and effective strategies. The workshop is designed to develop awareness of the needs of international students and other ESL learners in Jefferson programs and classes, to discuss teaching, curriculum design and communication strategies that may help such students, and to identify resources across campus that may aid International and ESL learners with coursework and / or other areas of need.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the unique needs of international students and other ESL learners
      • Develop strategies for addressing the needs or concerns of international students and other ESL learners
      • Apply these alternative strategies to the learning environment
      • Identify available campus resources to support international students and other ESL learners


    Nexus Learning 101: Active Learning Strategies
    Instructors: Jeff Ashley, PhD; Anne Bower, PhD; David Kratzer, MArch; Chris Pastor, PhD
    Date: 1/26/2018
    Time: 11:00am – 1:00pm
    Location: Paul Gutman Library, Instruction Space, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      One Nexus Learning tenet is ‘active and engaged’ learning. But what does that mean? In this session, we’ll explore active learning strategies. Participants will develop a plan to incorporate one active learning strategy in their course.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
      1) Understand what active learning encompasses and identify active learning strategies
      2) Develop a plan for incorporating an appropriate and doable active learning strategy within one of your courses to enhance a learning experience for your students
      3) Identify potential risks (and benefits) within that plan and formulate potential solutions (a ‘back pocket’ readiness plan)


    Creating a Learner-Centered Environment
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 1/29/2018
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      The educator’s role is undergoing a change in the 21st century. This transformation is, due in part to the information explosion, educational technologies, calls for accountability and demonstrations of student learning, and a growing body of evidence-based practices that document effective pedagogy. As a result, the instructional paradigm is giving way to the leaner-centered paradigm.

      Workshop participants will explore the paradigm shift and how the different approaches impact the way we approach the classroom in several key dimensions. Using short vignettes to illustrate the different dimensions, participants will be asked to imagine how adoption of a learner-centered dimension changes their approach to the classroom.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Summarize developments that allowed for growth of learner-centered paradigm
      • Identify key differences between the instructional and the learner-centered paradigms
      • Classify course practices and policies as more/less student-centered.


    Getting Started with Flipped Learning
    Instructors: Sherri Place, MS; May Truong-Merritt, MS
    Date: 2/2/2018
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Online Course - https://philau.zoom.us/j/346196414
    (Register for this session)

      Looking for ways to make the most of your face-to-face class time? Consider incorporating flipped learning! In this workshop, we’ll explore the Four Pillars of F-L-I-P that support active, engaged learning.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
      1) Identify the four pillars of F-L-I-P
      2) Describe one strategy for incorporating at least one pillar
      3) Design an action plan for flipping one class meeting within a course


    Creating & Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 2/6/2018
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This session will focus on communication and community building in fully online learning environments. The perceived lack of student-student and student-instructor interactions remains a fear for instructors and students new to online teaching and learning. In this session, participants will learn some tips and tricks for creating and maintaining communication and building a sense of community in their courses. The Community of Inquiry (CoI) Framework will be discussed as one method for understanding the value of Social Presence in this learning environment. Additionally, participants will hear from an instructor who made modifications to a course that proved beneficial for all.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
      • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
      • Identify some readily available tools and strategies for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions in their current courses


    Game-Based Learning – Getting Started
    Instructors: Chris Pastor, PhD; Jack Suss, PhD
    Date: 2/6/2018
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Paul Gutman Library, Instruction Space, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Game-based learning, or gamification of the classroom is gaining attention. The underlying principle is that if students are engaged in winning the game, they will put more active learning to play and, the literature suggest, increase retention. But what is gamification? Are there good games and bad games to deploy in the classroom? In this workshop, we will experience a few simple games and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of them as educational tools.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
      1) Understand the components of good games
      2) Apply components of gaming to begin to design a pedagogical game
      3) Design assessment tools to gauge success of your game


    Tools for Collaborative Creation
    Instructors: Sherri Place, MS; May Truong-Merritt, MS
    Date: 2/7/2018
    Time: 12:00pm – 12:30pm
    Location: Online Course - https://philau.zoom.us/j/919672133
    (Register for this session)

      Looking for technology tools that allow students to co-create and provide feedback or comments? In this short session, we’ll go beyond Blackboard’s group tools to explore tools that support student (and faculty!) collaboration.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Define your specific collaboration requirements
      2) Identify tools that support your learning goals
      3) Develop a plan for implementing a collaboration tool for at least one assignment in your course


    Listening Style as a Vehicle to Develop Empathy and Social Intelligence
    Instructor: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
    Date: 2/9/2018
    Time: 12:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Bluemle Life Sciences Building, Room 101, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Social intelligence (SQ) is of utmost importance in healthcare settings. Whether it’s interacting with patients and their families, or working with interprofessional, multidisciplinary teams, SQ is essential for successful outcomes. SQ ties into empathy; and healthcare professionals are expected to be display an empathic bedside manner. Unfortunately, formalized, robust training programs in SQ do not exist in the context of healthcare education.

      This workshop will help faculty members in their instruction of social intelligence in their learners; and will focus on their learners’ development into empathic clinicians via a novel vehicle: listening style. The workshop will use the Personal Listening Profile (PLP) as a vehicle for reflection on clinical practice. Specifically, the workshop will use faculty members’ PLP profile as a way to critically reflect on their social intelligence as they work on understanding and developing empathy.

      Time will be spent on: a) defining empathic accuracy and attunement; b) correlating these SQ competencies with listening approaches and listening styles; and c) applying concepts to bedside clinical skills (namely, the medical interview with the patient). While the workshop is focused on the faculty member as the learner, it will have the potential to ultimately impact both students, residents, and health trainees across the Thomas Jefferson University.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Define social intelligence and identify key SQ concepts (with a particular emphasis on attunement and empathic accuracy)
      2) Relate how social intelligence is tied to bedside manner, empathy, and the ACGME core competencies for medical education
      3) Apply personal listening approaches (and the PLP assessment) to explore empathy-building during the patient interview and patient encounter
      4) Formulate a plan for developing one’s empathic listening skills (part of one’s bedside manner) through the ORID framework


    Creating and Preparing Charts for Publication
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 2/13/2018
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Creating charts for publication is a snap with Microsoft Excel. The graphing and formatting of Excel make it a quick and easy solution for many types of data display. We’ll look at optimizing your format in Excel for easy placement into PowerPoint, Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop. Participants should already possess the skills to work with data in Excel.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Create various types of graphs including: bar charts, x-y plots, scatter plots
      2) Manipulate formatting to gain adequate resolution
      3) Add a chart to MS PowerPoint for automatic updating
      4) Copy and manipulate a chart in Photoshop that satisfies publishers’ requirements


    Fostering Engaged Student Learning Using Team-Based Learning
    Instructor: Jeff Ashley, PhD
    Date: 2/16/2018
    Time: 11:30am – 1:00pm
    Location: Paul Gutman Library, Instruction Space
    (Register for this session)

      Team-Based Learning (TBL) is an evidence-based collaborative learning teaching strategy designed around units of instruction, known as “modules,” that are taught in a three-step cycle: preparation, in-class readiness assurance testing, and application-focused exercise. This workshop puts you in the seat of a student to appreciate the process and effectiveness of TBL.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Understand the three modules of the team based learning process
      2) Apply team based learning strategies in their courses to optimize student preparation and incorporate higher order thinking skills


    A Novel Method to Publish Your Educational Scholarship and Work: MedEDPortal!
    Instructor: Nethra Ankam, MD
    Date: 3/6/2018
    Time: 8:00am – 9:00am
    Location: Bluemle Life Sciences Building, Room 101, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      MedEdPORTAL Publications is a free publication service provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in partnership with the American Dental Education Association. MedEDPORTAL Publications maintains a rigorous peer review process based on standards used in the scholarly publishing community. MedEdPORTAL offers educators tutorials, virtual patients, simulation cases, lab guides, video podcasts, assessment tools, and other resources to

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify MedEdPORTAL’s suite of services
      2) Describe submission standards and posting processes for MedEdPORTAL
      3) Review and discuss educational tools pertaining to MedEdPORTAL submissions
      4) Demonstrate navigating MedEdPORTAL’s live site


    Photoshop Basics for Teaching and Publication
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 3/6/2018
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This workshop will focus on the steps involved with manipulating digital images for teaching and publishing. Participants will be shown each step of the process—from digitizing images to managing files for all possible output types. Due to the limited number of site licenses for this program, participants will do hands-on work in small groups.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify the differences in image requirement for print and display
      2) Use the settings for adjusting image resolution
      3) Learn to crop and resize images
      4) Manipulate color including modes and saturation
      5) Apply labels to images
      6) Save images in different file formats


    Facilitating Discussions 101
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 3/8/2018
    Time: 3:00pm – 4:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Teaching through discussion rather than lecture presents unique set of opportunities and challenges for instructors. This workshop explores the power of discussion as a teaching tool and offers advice on strategies for incorporating discussion into in small, medium or large course environments.

      This experiential workshop will assist instructors in setting expectations for student preparation and involvement, developing a strategy for initiating conversations, and skills for sustaining and advancing a discussion. Participants will practice developing questions that launch productive discussions, effectives responses for probing responses and a sampling of discussion techniques for small or large groups.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Identify two ways to initiative a discussion in class
      • Describe key characteristics of good discussion questions
      • Explain two techniques for engaging learners in discussion


    Intermediate Photoshop
    Date: 3/13/2018
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This workshop is a continuation of Photoshop Basics offering a more in-depth exploration of this application’s functions. Topics will include: Automate functions, History Palette, Layers, layout and preparing images for use in MS Office applications. Due to the limited number of site licenses for this program, participants will do hands-on work in small groups. It is highly advised that Participants have an understanding of Photoshop or have attended the Photoshop Basics workshop to attend this workshop.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Use Automate functions to:
      a) Batch rename image files
      b) Create contact sheets
      c) Record and use Actions for repetitive tasks
      2) Use the History palette to undo selective changes
      3) Inserting guides and grids for layout
      4) Utilize layers


    Vernal Equinox Update on Scholarly Resources
    Instructor: East Falls East Falls Campus Librarians
    Date: 3/22/2018
    Time: 2:00pm – 3:15pm
    Location: Paul Gutman Library, Instruction Space, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Spring is a great time to think about future course planning and summer research goals. The librarians of Gutman Library will be hosting a round robin discussion of various new library resources and changes to services in the new enterprise. Question of all types are welcome as we sojourn across the nexus learning possibilities using library resources. After a group question and answer period, light refreshments will be served allowing one-on-one time with your friendly librarians to plan future collaborations.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Understand new database interfaces
      2) Identify changes to available resources
      3) Liaise with librarians for scheduling for the fall semester


    Fostering Wellness in Faculty and Learners in Health Professions
    Instructor: Stuart Slavin, MD, MEd
    Date: 3/23/2018
    Time: 9:00am – 1:00pm
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Eakins Lounge, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Stuart Slavin is known for recognizing and combatting high depression rates of medical students. With a focus on faculty, this session will explore cognitive behavioral techniques and the learning environment. Find out how maladaptive perfectionism and toxic work environments can affect our students and our ability to teach effectively. In small groups, strategize to foster resilience and coping skills. End the session by participating in a personal wellness activity.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Understand the six components of the work environment
      2) Discuss the role of cognitive behavior techniques regarding an individual's interaction with the learning environment
      3) Strategize how to reduce stressors and change toxic environments
      4) Develop a toolbox for fostering resilience and coping skills in faculty and learners


    Teaching with Technology: How to decide What Works for You and Your Students?
    Instructor: David Kratzer, MArch
    Date: 3/29/2018
    Time: 11:30am – 1:00pm
    Location: Paul Gutman Library, Instruction Space, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Adopting a new technology can be time-consuming, risky, and may not align with your student learning goals. This workshop explores the myriad of tech-assisted teaching and learning methods that can be used to more fully engage students in applied and meaningful interactions with course content and skill development.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
      1) Identify areas within their courses where technology could be used to enhance student learning outcomes
      2) Create a tech-assisted teaching strategy that can be implemented in an existing or future course
      3) Identify assessment tools that can be used to measure the effectiveness of implemented tech-assisted teaching and learning strategies


    Teaching for Different Environments
    Date: 4/8/2018
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 306, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This session consists of an overview of the differences in teaching and learning across the three learning environments – Traditional/Face-to-Face, Blended/Hybrid and Fully Online. Knowledge is power – join us in exploring the unique differences between learning environments that include teaching and student learning challenges and evidence-based effective practices.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Describe the differences in teaching challenges between the three different learning environments
      • Describe the differences in the student learning experience challenges between the three different learning environments
      • Provide examples of evidence-based strategies for effective teaching in each of the learning environments
      • Explain how the strategies discussed during the session can improve the student learning experience


    Teaching and Learning Online: A Dive into the Unknown
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 4/18/2018
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      This session will take a dive into the uniqueness of the fully online learning environment and what that means for instructors and students. Current research, evidence-based practices and tips and tricks will be shared with participants. In this session we will review, in part, the role of online course structure, communication and engagement in student satisfaction and success. Please join us if you are thinking about moving a course online at some point, are currently teaching online or simply want to learn more about online teaching and learning.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Describe the current evidence-based research on online teaching and student satisfaction
      • Describe and conceptualize one or more strategies in their current or future online teaching practices


    Basic and Advanced Concepts in Facilitation
    Instructors: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH; Julie Phillips, PhD; Peter Scoles, MD; Susan Truong, MD
    Date: 4/20/2018
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Eakins Lounge , Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Facilitation in health professions education is essential. Effective facilitation skills enable educators to take charge of the learning environment to guide learning in multiple settings, including the classroom and/or lecture hall; the simulation laboratory; and even the bedside. When executed successfully, a facilitator encourages learners to think productively; articulate ideas; ask important questions; make connections; find solutions; and identify next steps to take action for their learning.

      This workshop will allow participants to explore what it means to be a facilitator and to recognize when the time calls for a shift towards facilitated learning. Time will be spent on developing and practicing facilitation techniques. Through small group exercise, participants will also gain the experiential knowledge that will help them develop these skills.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Differentiate between facilitation and standard teaching
      2) Identify opportunities for facilitating learning in the classroom, at the simulation center, during case-based learning (CBL) sessions, and at the bedside.
      3) Discuss and practice facilitations strategies faculty can use to engage their learners


    An Introduction to Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Collaborative Practice (CP)
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 4/20/2018
    Time: 10:30am – 12:00pm
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Eakins Lounge, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice (CP) are now broadly viewed as imperatives for meeting the Quadruple Aim of healthcare, with IPE playing an integral part of health professions accreditation requirements. This workshop will focus on developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSA) necessary to prepare a collaborative practice-ready workforce and meet the demands of accreditors. Following a brief presentation regarding the history and rationale relative to IPE and CP, participants will use selected case studies from Jefferson’s Center for Interprofessional Education (JCIPE) to see firsthand how such initiatives can be effectively designed, implemented and assessed. They will have an opportunity to apply the Jefferson Teamwork Observation Guide (JTOG), a validated, mobile application assessment tool allowing for 360-degree observations of teamwork behaviors.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Define interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice (CP)
      2) List three interprofessional learning objectives for an IPE or CP program
      3) Apply the Jefferson Teamwork Observation Guide (JTOG) to assess teamwork and CP behaviors
      4) Conduct a SWOT analysis for implementation and assessment of an innovative IPE or CP program at their home institution


    Teaching Highly Kinesthetic and Visual-Spatial Skills
    Instructor: team (see below)
    Date: 4/20/2018
    Time: 1:00pm – 4:00pm
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Eakins Lounge, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Instructors: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH, EdD(c); Kathy Shaffer, RN, EdD; Ronald Hall, MD; Gretchen Diemer, MD; Abigail Wolf, MD

      Whether it's how to deliver a baby, how to place an IV, or using an ultrasound to visualize a patient’s anatomy, educators are challenged with finding best practices to instruct kinesthetic skills. They require a toolkit to help their learners achieve procedural competency. In this workshop, frameworks for kinesthetic and visual-spatial skills will be introduced, and case studies will be used to reinforce concepts. The workshop will also allow for the deliberate practice of effective teaching skills during these circumstances.

      The proposed workshop will incorporate various strategies to help the simulation educator with the instruction of procedural skills. Procedural exemplars from several specialties across varied professions will be used. The overarching goal is to have these skills readily transferrable to other concepts that may be exclusively kinesthetic and/or visual-spatial in nature.

      Strategies discussed will include, but not be limited to: heuristic models and frameworks that will help educators prepare for and optimize learning strategies for their audiences; coaching techniques; everyday games (i.e., LEGOs, Play Dough) that will be used as educational adjuncts for procedural instruction will be discussed; and hands-on practice with low- and high-fidelity simulation task trainers.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Discuss heuristic models for procedural instruction, and apply strategies to help struggling learners when acquiring procedural skills training during simulation-based educational programming.
      2) Practice coaching methods to help trainees effectively manipulate equipment when operating on task trainers.
      3) Apply educational adjuncts to better assist trainees in conceptualizing three-dimensional anatomy.


    A Look at Online and Hybrid/Blended Course (Re-)Design and the Student Experience
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 5/1/2018
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Not all courses are created equal. This session will focus on course design in online and blended/hybrid courses and the impact it has on the student experience. Evidence-based practices will be shared with participants and examples of different, yet effective, course designs. The presentation will showcase at least one before and after example of a course re-design that will be shared by the presenter and a course instructor.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
      • Explain how course design can negatively and positively impact the student experience in online and hybrid/blended courses
      • Identify two – three features of various course designs presented that they would consider incorporating in a current or future online or hybrid/blended course


    Crafting a Self-Reflective Teaching or Professional Development Portfolio Workshop
    Instructors: Jeff Ashley, PhD; Susan Frosten, MArch
    Date: 5/14/2018
    Time: 9:30am – 4:00pm
    Location: Kanbar Campus Center, Room 306, East Falls Campus
    (Register for this session)

      Monday, May 14 to Wednesday, May 16, 2018 (3 days)

      As defined by Peter Seldin (co-author of The Teaching Portfolio), a teaching portfolio is a factual description of a professor’s teaching strengths and accomplishments which includes documents and materials that collectively suggest the scope and quality of a professor’s teaching performance. This 3-day workshop pairs participants with mentors to construct a teaching (or professional development) portfolio that is reflective, evidence-based, and richly provides insight into who you are as a teacher.