Educator's Toolbox
Curriculum for Educators

    Not All Courses are Created Equal: Developing and Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 8/19/2016
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      One of the most prominent fears for faculty and students alike when teaching or taking a fully online course is the perceived lack of social presence in the absence of in-person interactions. Fully online courses that are designed with community-building tasks and activities have resulted in greater student and Facilitator satisfaction and perceived learning (eg., Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000; Richardson & Swan, 2003; Rovai, 2002; Rovai, Ponton & Baker, 2008). This workshop will include discussions and evidence-based materials that will help you think about online teaching and learning with a new lens.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
      • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
      • Name some readily available tools for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions


    Building a Better Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 8/24/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      According to classroom observations and self-report data, instructors rely heavily on lecture as an instructional method despite research documenting the limited effectiveness of lectures as a teaching strategy. Lectures can be integral to the learning experience with an understanding of the factors contributing to its effectiveness as an instructional tool. This workshop will focus on identifying key uses of lecture and three simple strategies for building more effective learning experiences for students. Participants are asked to identify and bring a lecture they have previously developed for use during the experiential workshop.

      Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be to:
      • Identify best uses of lecture
      • Define one organizing technique for lectures
      • Incorporate signposts into a planned lecture experience
      • Apply best practices to a planned lecture experience


    Universal Design (UD) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL): What Are They and How Do They Impact My Students?
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 8/31/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      UDL and UD are terms that are often used interchangeably but they are different in several ways. Universal Design for Learning is “a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn” (Rose & Meyer, 1984). Universal Design refers to what we must do by law to ensure physical access to buildings and spaces for individuals with disabilities. This session will include discussions and information on UDL and UD and specific methods for implementing the principles of UDL in our teaching.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Differentiate between the terms Universal Design for Learning and Universal Design
      • Describe ways in which UD may be applicable in their classrooms, buildings or community
      • Describe several ways in which the principles of UDL may be applied in one or more of their courses


    Assessment Essentials
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 9/13/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      As health care professionals, each of us embraces the concept of assessment, so much so that Physical Assessment is often given its own course in a curriculum. This one-hour workshop may serve as a primer and/or a refresher on the most basic concepts in educational assessment.

      Topics include:
      • Formative vs. Summative Assessment
      • Bloom’s Taxonomy and performance domains
      • Reliability, Validity and Assessment Statistics
      • Policies and a Systematic Approach


    Teaching and Supporting International Students and Other ESL Learners
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; James  Dyksen, MSEd-TESOL
    Date: 9/20/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      International students and other students for whom English is a second language face a unique set of challenges and issues as they adjust to study in the degree programs at Jefferson, and, in many cases, to living in the US for the first time. This workshop will elicit faculty experiences teaching and working with ESL learners, including both concerns and effective strategies. The workshop is designed to develop awareness of the needs of international students and other ESL learners in Jefferson programs and classes, to discuss teaching, curriculum design and communication strategies that may help such students, and to identify resources across campus that may aid International and ESL learners with coursework and / or other areas of need.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the unique needs of international students and other ESL learners
      • Develop strategies for addressing the needs or concerns of international students and other ESL learners
      • Apply these alternative strategies to the learning environment
      • Identify available campus resources to support international students and other ESL learners


    Electronic Portfolios for Academic Programs and Career Success
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Anthony J Frisby, PhD
    Date: 10/10/2016
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The fields of art, architecture and engineering have long used portfolio’s as a way for both students – and professionals – to show case their work. Not unexpectedly, these physical portfolios have found their way onto the digital world and are often called e-portfolios. Whether physical or electronic this tool for show casing a person’s skills and experience is valuable. Both to the learner as evidence of their accomplishments and as a tool to help them stand out as a better candidate in the hiring process. Portfolios can also play an important role in the professional development of a student. Specific course projects that meet academic objectives can be reflected on, solidifying the students understanding of concepts and the skills they’ve mastered.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
      • Identify how portfolios can be used in the academic program to track student progress and mastery of skills
      • Observe a demonstration of sample portfolios in Jefferson’s portfolio product, Portfoliu
      • Identify which assignments in your course would be appropriate for showcasing student achievement in a portfolio


    To Record or Not to Record: A Session on When, Why and How to Integrate Video Content
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 10/18/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this session)

      Understanding the student benefits of instructor-recorded video content will be discussed. Equally as important is the understanding of when to do so – just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. During this session, we will also explore tools that are user-friendly and freely available for use in our courses.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the benefits of instructor-recorded video content
      • Describe ways in which video content may be effectively integrated into their course
      • Identify several user-friendly and freely available video tools
      • Develop a plan for at least one instructor-recorded video for the current or future semester


    Just In Time Low-Stakes Formative Assessments: Tips and Strategies to Inform Instruction
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 11/1/2016
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      In this workshop, we will discuss and practice using evidence-based strategies for assessing student understanding of the content throughout the semester. This ‘just in time’ data provides ongoing feedback used by instructors to adjust their teaching to improve student outcomes. Formative assessments are also designed to help students identify their strengths and areas in need of more targeted work prior to taking high-stakes exams and other assessments. Formative assessments need not be time consuming to create or to deliver and analyze.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Understand the purposes of and differences between formative and summative assessments
      • Describe multiple formative assessment options for use in their courses
      • Create at least one formative assessment for immediate use in one or more courses


    Clinical Behavior: Evaluating a Student’s Professionalism
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 11/16/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      Many health care accreditation organizations require that programs not only foster professionalism, but also demonstrate that graduates possess these qualities. The evaluation of values, affect and communication skill is significantly more difficult than the evaluation of cognition or psychomotor skill. If evaluating professionalism troubles you, this one-hour workshop should being to ease your discomfort.

      Topics include:
      • Validity of Measurement in the Affective Domain
      • Strategies to Improve Reliability of Affective Domain Assessment Instruments
      • Formative and Summative Evaluations of Professionalism


    Assessing the Skillful (or not-so Skillful) Practitioner
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 11/29/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The psychomotor domain is by far the most resource intensive of the three (cognitive, affective, psychomotor) domains to measure. This one-hour workshop will explore the difficulties associated with evaluating skill performance and strategies to overcome these obstacles.

      Topics include:
      • Validity of Measurement in the Psychomotor Domain
      • Skill Acquisition, Scaffolding and the Assessment Cycle
      • Strategies to Reliably Recognize the Skillful Practicioner


    Not All Courses are Created Equal: Developing and Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 1/6/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      One of the most prominent fears for faculty and students alike when teaching or taking a fully online course is the perceived lack of social presence in the absence of in-person interactions. Fully online courses that are designed with community-building tasks and activities have resulted in greater student and Facilitator satisfaction and perceived learning (eg., Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000; Richardson & Swan, 2003; Rovai, 2002; Rovai, Ponton & Baker, 2008). This workshop will include discussions and evidence-based materials that will help you think about online teaching and learning with a new lens.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
      • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
      • Name some readily available tools for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions


    Teaching and Supporting International Students and Other ESL Learners
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; James  Dyksen, MSEd-TESOL
    Date: 1/18/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      International students and other students for whom English is a second language face a unique set of challenges and issues as they adjust to study in the degree programs at Jefferson, and, in many cases, to living in the US for the first time. This workshop will elicit faculty experiences teaching and working with ESL learners, including both concerns and effective strategies. The workshop is designed to develop awareness of the needs of international students and other ESL learners in Jefferson programs and classes, to discuss teaching, curriculum design and communication strategies that may help such students, and to identify resources across campus that may aid International and ESL learners with coursework and / or other areas of need.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the unique needs of international students and other ESL learners
      • Develop strategies for addressing the needs or concerns of international students and other ESL learners
      • Apply these alternative strategies to the learning environment
      • Identify available campus resources to support international students and other ESL learners


    Building a Better Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 1/20/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      According to classroom observations and self-report data, instructors rely heavily on lecture as an instructional method despite research documenting the limited effectiveness of lectures as a teaching strategy. Lectures can be integral to the learning experience with an understanding of the factors contributing to its effectiveness as an instructional tool. This workshop will focus on identifying key uses of lecture and three simple strategies for building more effective learning experiences for students. Participants are asked to identify and bring a lecture they have previously developed for use during the experiential workshop.

      Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be to:
      • Identify best uses of lecture
      • Define one organizing technique for lectures
      • Incorporate signposts into a planned lecture experience
      • Apply best practices to a planned lecture experience


    Universal Design (UD) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL): What Are They and How Do They Impact My Students?
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 1/31/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      UDL and UD are terms that are often used interchangeably but they are different in several ways. Universal Design for Learning is “a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn” (Rose & Meyer, 1984). Universal Design refers to what we must do by law to ensure physical access to buildings and spaces for individuals with disabilities. This session will include discussions and information on UDL and UD and specific methods for implementing the principles of UDL in our teaching.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Differentiate between the terms Universal Design for Learning and Universal Design
      • Describe ways in which UD may be applicable in their classrooms, buildings or community
      • Describe several ways in which the principles of UDL may be applied in one or more of their courses


    Active Teaching, Engaging Minds
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 2/3/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      Active teaching is an umbrella term used to identify a variety of teaching strategies. It includes most anything that students do in a classroom other than passively listening to an instructor’s lecture. Research demonstrates active learning improves students' understanding and retention of information and can be very effective in developing higher order cognitive skills such as problem solving and critical thinking. Active learning, however, presents challenges and requires re-thinking the classroom space and traditional roles.

      This interactive workshop will:
      • summarize the impact of active teaching on student learning
      • demonstrate a handful of active teaching strategies
      • discuss some challenges to adopting active teaching techniques


    Assessment Essentials
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 2/7/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      As health care professionals, each of us embraces the concept of assessment, so much so that Physical Assessment is often given its own course in a curriculum. This one-hour workshop may serve as a primer and/or a refresher on the most basic concepts in educational assessment.

      Topics include:
      • Formative vs. Summative Assessment
      • Bloom’s Taxonomy and performance domains
      • Reliability, Validity and Assessment Statistics
      • Policies and a Systematic Approach


    To Record or Not to Record: A Session on When, Why and How to Integrate Video Content
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 3/15/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this session)

      Understanding the student benefits of instructor-recorded video content will be discussed. Equally as important is the understanding of when to do so – just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. During this session, we will also explore tools that are user-friendly and freely available for use in our courses.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the benefits of instructor-recorded video content
      • Describe ways in which video content may be effectively integrated into their course
      • Identify several user-friendly and freely available video tools
      • Develop a plan for at least one instructor-recorded video for the current or future semester


    The Active Learning Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 3/20/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The large lecture presents a number of challenges to experienced and novice instructors alike. This workshop explores some of the challenges (and assumptions we make about what can or cannot happen in a large lecture) and describes a number of techniques to assist faculty transition from the “sage on the stage” to a “guide on the side.”

      This interactive workshop will:
      • describe benefits and challenges associated with a traditional lecture model
      • explore instructor and student assumptions about large enrollment courses
      • identify potential engaged learning activities for the large lecture courses
      • demonstrate a handful of techniques to enhance large lecture courses


    Just In Time Low-Stakes Formative Assessments: Tips and Strategies to Inform Instruction
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 3/28/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      In this workshop, we will discuss and practice using evidence-based strategies for assessing student understanding of the content throughout the semester. This ‘just in time’ data provides ongoing feedback used by instructors to adjust their teaching to improve student outcomes. Formative assessments are also designed to help students identify their strengths and areas in need of more targeted work prior to taking high-stakes exams and other assessments. Formative assessments need not be time consuming to create or to deliver and analyze.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Understand the purposes of and differences between formative and summative assessments
      • Describe multiple formative assessment options for use in their courses
      • Create at least one formative assessment for immediate use in one or more courses


    Clinical Behavior: Evaluating a Student’s Professionalism
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 4/5/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      Many health care accreditation organizations require that programs not only foster professionalism, but also demonstrate that graduates possess these qualities. The evaluation of values, affect and communication skill is significantly more difficult than the evaluation of cognition or psychomotor skill. If evaluating professionalism troubles you, this one-hour workshop should being to ease your discomfort.

      Topics include:
      • Validity of Measurement in the Affective Domain
      • Strategies to Improve Reliability of Affective Domain Assessment Instruments
      • Formative and Summative Evaluations of Professionalism


    Electronic Portfolios for Academic Programs and Career Success
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 4/28/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The fields of art, architecture and engineering have long used portfolio’s as a way for both students – and professionals – to show case their work. Not unexpectedly, these physical portfolios have found their way onto the digital world and are often called e-portfolios. Whether physical or electronic this tool for show casing a person’s skills and experience is valuable. Both to the learner as evidence of their accomplishments and as a tool to help them stand out as a better candidate in the hiring process. Portfolios can also play an important role in the professional development of a student. Specific course projects that meet academic objectives can be reflected on, solidifying the students understanding of concepts and the skills they’ve mastered.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
      • Identify how portfolios can be used in the academic program to track student progress and mastery of skills
      • Observe a demonstration of sample portfolios in Jefferson’s portfolio product, Portfoliu
      • Identify which assignments in your course would be appropriate for showcasing student achievement in a portfolio


    Assessing the Skillful (or not-so Skillful) Practitioner
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 5/2/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The psychomotor domain is by far the most resource intensive of the three (cognitive, affective, psychomotor) domains to measure. This one-hour workshop will explore the difficulties associated with evaluating skill performance and strategies to overcome these obstacles.

      Topics include:
      • Validity of Measurement in the Psychomotor Domain
      • Skill Acquisition, Scaffolding and the Assessment Cycle
      • Strategies to Reliably Recognize the Skillful Practicioner