Educator's Toolbox
Curriculum for Educators

    Faculty Fundamentals: Basic Skills for Teaching in the Health Professions: The Scoop on Active Learning
    Instructors: Elena Umland, PharmD, JSP, Pharmacy Practice; Adam Persky, PhD; Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
    Date: 9/5/2014
    Time: 8:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      Active learning has received considerable attention over the past several years. It is defined as any instructional method that engages learners in the learning process, requiring learners to partake in meaningful learning activities and think about what they are doing. Active learning has the potential to promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of course content. Typical strategies that have promoted active learning include cooperative learning, problem-based learning, and the use of case- and simulation-based instructional methodologies.

      This session will challenge some commonly held assumptions about learning, and discuss some of the research in the area of cognitive psychology, education, and physiology that hold direct implications for teaching. In addition, a number of easily adaptable classroom activities will be used during the session. The session will be divided into three parts: 1) An Introduction to Active Learning; 2) Strategies to Bring Active Learning into Coursework; and 3) Strategies to Bring Active Learning into the Clinical Setting.

      The workshop will demonstrate and explain how make classroom learning more meaningful.
      Attendees will gain a better understanding of how students learn, how to facilitate higher-order learning, and how to help students study effectively to achieve these goals.

      At the end of the session, participants will:

      1) Discuss at least three “lessons learned” (key concepts) that can inform their teaching practice.
      2) Identify at least three specific teaching strategies, techniques, or tools that they can adopt and apply to classroom instruction
      3) Identify at least two useful resources and references for follow-up
      4) Discuss potential barriers and solutions to incorporating active learning to improve student learning


    Improving Teaching with Peer-to-Peer Assessment
    Instructors: John M Spandorfer, Dr., MD; David Abraham (JMC/JCGS)
    Date: 9/5/2014
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      It has been recognized that engaging learners (i.e., students and/or faculty) in peer assessment can deepen the learner’s understanding of his/her own learning and empower the learner to become more actively engaged and self-directed in the learning process. While peer assessment can assist in providing formative or summative feedback to learners, it has the potential to encourage reflection; develop judgment skills; guide feedback; and promote ownership of the learning process. Given that there is no set paradigm on how to integrate peer-to-peer assessments in healthcare education, however, its incorporation into the curricula of nursing, medicine, and allied health professions educational programs has been limited.

      This workshop will showcase the work of two faculty members at SKMC who have successfully incorporated innovative peer-to-peer assessment strategies for both medical students and medical school faculty.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

      1) Define and describe peer assessment, specifically as it pertains to learners in the healthcare profession
      2) Predict and discuss the challenges of integrating peer assessment strategies for both faculty- and student-learners
      3) Relate peer assessment strategies that have been successful in the Thomas Jefferson University community


    Beyond Multiple Choice Exams: Identifying Optimal Assessment Strategies
    Instructors: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH; Peter Scoles, MD
    Date: 9/5/2014
    Time: 2:00pm – 3:30pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      Beyond Multiple Choice Exams: Identifying Optimal Assessment Strategies
      Instructors: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH, Peter Scoles, MD
      Date: Friday, September 5, 2014
      Time: 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
      Location: 101 BLSB
      Maximum Enrollment: 100
      CME credits:

      The debate on optimal assessment strategies is not a new one. For decades in healthcare, student learning has been typically based on multiple-choice exam testing; but now that we have entered a new age of learning and a new type of learner, educators are pushed to explore alternative approaches to assessing students’ content mastery and skills.

      In the session, we will discuss the importance of linking assessment with learning objectives and learning outcomes; the need to make teaching learner-centric; and introduce approaches to “real-time” assessments.

      At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

      1) Recognize the role of learning objectives in deciding what knowledge and skills to assess
      2) Discuss the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor considerations of assessment
      3) Explore a range of assessment methods for skills assessment
      4) Apply low- and high-fidelity simulation modalities for skills assessment


    Key Steps in Writing-and Publishing-Your Manuscript
    Instructor: Jennifer Wilson, MS
    Date: 10/15/2014
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Librry, RM 200A
    (Register for this session)

      Key Steps in Writing—and Publishing—Your Manuscript
      Instructor: Jennifer Fisher Wilson, MS*
      Date: Wednesday, October 15, 2014
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
      Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A
      Maximum Enrollment:
      CME credits:

      This presentation provides advice on how to be more organized and less overwhelmed when you write your next manuscript. It also focuses on key elements of manuscript writing, with a focus on engaging an editor’s attention.

      Upon completion of this session, participants will:
      1) List the key points to keep in mind when starting a manuscript
      2) Identify the parts of the manuscript readers are most likely to see and common methods for improving them
      3) Apply a systematic approach to writing the body of a paper


    Introduction to a Noval Method for Educational Scholarship Dissemination: Med EDPortal
    Instructor: Nethra Ankam, MD
    Date: 10/17/2014
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      Introduction to a Novel Method for Educational Scholarship Dissemination: MedEDPortal
      Instructor: Nethra Ankam, MD
      Date: Friday, October 17, 2014
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
      Location: 101 BLSB
      Maximum Enrollment: 30
      CME credits:

      MedEdPORTAL Publications is a free publication service provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in partnership with the American Dental Education Association. MedEDPORTAL Publications maintains a rigorous peer review process based on standards used in the scholarly publishing community. MedEdPORTAL offers educators tutorials, virtual patients, simulation cases, lab guides, video podcasts, assessment tools, and other resources to

      At the end of the session, participants will:

      1) Introduce MedEdPORTAL’s suite of services (Publications, iCollaborative, CE Directory)
      2) Describe submission standards and posting processes for MedEdPORTAL
      3) Review and discuss educational tools pertaining to MedEdPORTAL submissions
      4) Demonstrate navigating MedEdPORTAL’s live site


    Design for Engaged Learning
    Instructor: Ellen Goldman, EdD
    Date: 11/5/2014
    Time: 9:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      Design for Engaged Learning
      Instructor: Ellen Goldman, EdD *
      Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2014
      Time: 9:00 am – 10:45 am
      Location: 101 BLSB
      Maximum Enrollment: 100
      CME credits:
      This workshop will help participants assimilate principles of adult learning and effective instructional design techniques as they integrate active learning into their courses. Participants will be provided with frameworks and resources to guide them through the design process, including a step-by-step class design framework, descriptions of 22 active learning techniques, and a reference list.
      The materials presented and used can be applied to any course and used with any audience, so the applicability of this session extends to all areas of the health sciences.
      At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
      1) Identify the major components of effective learner-centered instructional design
      2) Recognize the power of active engagement of students in the learning process
      3) Reformulate a traditional teaching session with strategies for active engagement


    Apps Smackdown
    Instructors: Martha Ankeny, M.Ed; Brian Cuzzolina
    Date: 11/5/2014
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      Apps Smackdown
      Instructors: Martha Langley Ankeny, M.Ed., Brian Cuzzolina
      Date: Wednesday, November 5, 2014
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
      Location: 101 BLSB
      Maximum Enrollment: 100
      CME credits:

      There is an App for just about everything! As of June 2014, there were 1,200,000 Apps in the iTunes App Store. Surprisingly, educational Apps are the second-most popular category of downloads.

      In this session, we will walk through how to find, review, download, and organize Apps. We’ll also talk about how to get help using specific Apps. Time will also be spend on Apps popular to the Jefferson community, including Browzine, iAnnotate, Inkling, Kno, and iMedicalApps.

      So bring your iPAD, along with your Apple ID and password, and we will download some Apps. Or, if you’re feeling adventurous, go ahead and download something before you arrive.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

      1) Search, find, and evaluate Apps
      2) Download and organize Apps on an iPAD or Tablet device
      3) Find help using Apps


    From Rough Draft to Publication: A Workshop on Developing your Educational Projects for Publication onto MedEdPORTAL
    Instructor: Nethra Ankam, MD
    Date: 11/14/2014
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: 216 Hamilton
    (Register for this session)

      From Rough Draft to Publication: A Workshop on Developing your Educational Projects for Publication onto MedEdPORTAL
      Instructor: Nethra Ankam, MD
      Date: November 14, 2014
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
      Location: 216 Hamilton Building
      Maximum Enrollment: 10
      CME credits:

      This workshop will introduce strategies to help faculty develop their current educational activities, ideas, and programs into scholarly projects for potential publication onto the AAMC’s MedEdPORTAL. Participants will be asked to bring their rough drafts (the educational content they would like to see to publication) to the workshop, where they will apply the processes for successful development into scholarly work. Participants will work through real-life examples that will facilitate understanding the processes of clearing a publication from a copyright standpoint, as well as creating an instructor’s guide. Registration will be limited to only 10 participants.

      Through didactic and hands-on learning activities and discussion, participants in this session will:

      1) Identify MedEDPortal and distinguish its role in creating an open exchange of health education teaching and assessment resources
      2) Relate the MedEdPORTAL’s rigorous peer-review processes for successful publication
      3) Develop a plan for turning current educational content into educational scholarship
      4) Apply processes and strategies for publication to their own work


    Grant Writing Workshop
    Instructors: Lorraine Iacovitti, PhD; Laurence C Eisenlohr, PhD, VMD; Carol L Prem; Scott Waldman, M.D., Ph.D
    Date: 11/18/2014
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      Grant Writing Workshop
      Instructors: Raymond Penn, PhD, Scott Waldman, PhD, Gerald Grunwald, PhD, Lorraine Iacovitti, PhD, Ike Eisenlohr, PhD, and Carol Prem
      Dates: Tuesdays, November 18, November 25, December 2, December 9 and December 16, 2014
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
      Location:
      Maximum Enrollment: 50
      CME credits:

      This five session workshop series, taught by experienced investigators, will help early to mid-career investigators to successfully prepare and submit competitive research proposals. The series is designed to prepare investigators for submission of an NIH type grant. The series will be most helpful to those investigators who are currently in the process of preparing a grant submission and have identified a senior faculty mentor to review components of the grant as they are developed. Session topics include:
      1) Understanding the review process and general strategies for grant preparation
      2) Writing a grant, Part 1: Specific Aims, Significance/Innovation, and Preparing a response to an A0 submission
      3) Writing a grant Part 2: Organization and Development of the Research Strategy
      4) Grant Writing Tips: Grammar/Style/Tone, Successful Strategies, Common Missteps, and Helpful Resources
      5) Nuts and Bolts of grant submission: Preparation of the budget, electronic submission, etc.

      At the end of the series, participants will:
      1) Discuss the scientific review process including how grants are reviewed and scored
      2) List different type of grant mechanisms and explain the best mechanism to use for specific types of research
      3) Define strategies for the preparation of a successful grant application
      4) List common mistakes made during the grant preparation process
      5) Prepare an accurate budget for an R0-1 type grant application



    Design for Engaged Learning
    Instructor: Ellen Goldman, EdD
    Date: 11/19/2014
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      Design for Engaged Learning
      Instructor: Ellen Goldman, EdD *
      Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2014
      Time: 9:00 am – 10:45 am
      Location: 101 BLSB
      Maximum Enrollment: 100
      CME credits:
      This workshop will help participants assimilate principles of adult learning and effective instructional design techniques as they integrate active learning into their courses. Participants will be provided with frameworks and resources to guide them through the design process, including a step-by-step class design framework, descriptions of 22 active learning techniques, and a reference list.
      The materials presented and used can be applied to any course and used with any audience, so the applicability of this session extends to all areas of the health sciences.
      At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
      1) Identify the major components of effective learner-centered instructional design
      2) Recognize the power of active engagement of students in the learning process
      3) Reformulate a traditional teaching session with strategies for active engagement


    Design for Engaged Learning
    Instructor: Ellen Goldman, EdD
    Date: 11/19/2014
    Time: 10:30am – 12:00pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      Design for Engaged Learning
      Instructor: Ellen Goldman, EdD *
      Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2014
      Time: 9:00 am – 10:45 am
      Location: 101 BLSB
      Maximum Enrollment: 100
      CME credits:
      This workshop will help participants assimilate principles of adult learning and effective instructional design techniques as they integrate active learning into their courses. Participants will be provided with frameworks and resources to guide them through the design process, including a step-by-step class design framework, descriptions of 22 active learning techniques, and a reference list.
      The materials presented and used can be applied to any course and used with any audience, so the applicability of this session extends to all areas of the health sciences.
      At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
      1) Identify the major components of effective learner-centered instructional design
      2) Recognize the power of active engagement of students in the learning process
      3) Reformulate a traditional teaching session with strategies for active engagement


    Designing and Implementing Effective Learning Communities
    Instructors: Ellen Goldman, EdD; Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
    Date: 11/19/2014
    Time: 11:00am – 12:30pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      Designing and Implementing Effective Learning Communities
      Instructor: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH, Ellen Goldman, EdD *
      Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2014
      Time: 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
      Location: 101 BLSB
      Maximum Enrollment: 100
      CME credits:
      Whether you provide healthcare in the clinic, the emergency department, or the ICU; whether you eat lunch in the cafeteria or in the office; whether you belong to a journal club or a book club; or whether you subscribe to a discussion board or a newsgroup – chances are that you already belong to a community of practice. It's even likely that you belong to multiple communities of practice.
      The concept of a community of practice (CoP) is not a new phenomenon – this type of learning practice existed for as long as individuals have been learning and sharing their experiences through storytelling. Individuals that comprises a CoP can evolve and learn naturally because of a common interest in a particular domain (i.e., a profession), or the group can be created specifically with the goal of gaining knowledge related to a field.
      Consider your professional medical society membership; that qualifies as a community of practice. Consider your professional memberships on-campus at Thomas Jefferson University (i.e., committees, councils, etc.); those, too, count as communities of practice. And within each community, there is learning that takes place.
      So why do we subscribe ourselves to these communities? Why are communities of practice so vital to our pedagogy? And is there a way we can leverage communities of practice to foster learning in our students and trainees?
      At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
      1) Define and describe a community of practice
      2) Discuss the role of communities of practice in medical educational curricula
      3) Relate and critique an example of the application of a CoP learning model in a medical school curriculum
      Explore potential applications for communities of practice in healthcare education


      * Dr. Ellen Goldman is an Associate Professor of Human and Organizational Learning and Director of the Master Teacher Leadership Development Program, a partnership with the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Her scholarship and practice focus on learning and leadership to enhance individual and organizational performance. Dr. Goldman has studied the development of strategic thinking ability and its application to management development and changing organizational culture. Her research identifying work experiences that contribute to the development of expertise in strategic thinking won the Richard A. Swanson Research Excellence Award. Dr. Goldman has also published on learning in medical training and professional development programs. Her current research interests include educational and organizational practices that develop leadership abilities and higher level thinking skills.
      Dr. Goldman has over 30 years experience as a healthcare executive and consultant. She has worked with over 300 hospitals and healthcare systems to craft corporate, business and programmatic strategy; assess and implement mergers; identify acquisitions and other growth initiatives, and develop board and managerial leadership. Dr. Goldman holds an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh and an EdD from The George Washington University. She consults and teaches nationally with health care systems on strategic thinking and leadership development.


    Grant Writing Workshop
    Instructors: Raymond Penn, PhD; Scott Waldman, M.D., Ph.D; Laurence C Eisenlohr, PhD, VMD; Lorraine Iacovitti, PhD
    Date: 11/25/2014
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      Grant Writing Workshop
      Instructors: Raymond Penn, PhD, Scott Waldman, PhD, Gerald Grunwald, PhD, Lorraine Iacovitti, PhD, Ike Eisenlohr, PhD, and Carol Prem
      Dates: Tuesdays, November 18, November 25, December 2, December 9 and December 16, 2014
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
      Location:
      Maximum Enrollment: 50
      CME credits:

      This five session workshop series, taught by experienced investigators, will help early to mid-career investigators to successfully prepare and submit competitive research proposals. The series is designed to prepare investigators for submission of an NIH type grant. The series will be most helpful to those investigators who are currently in the process of preparing a grant submission and have identified a senior faculty mentor to review components of the grant as they are developed. Session topics include:
      1) Understanding the review process and general strategies for grant preparation
      2) Writing a grant, Part 1: Specific Aims, Significance/Innovation, and Preparing a response to an A0 submission
      3) Writing a grant Part 2: Organization and Development of the Research Strategy
      4) Grant Writing Tips: Grammar/Style/Tone, Successful Strategies, Common Missteps, and Helpful Resources
      5) Nuts and Bolts of grant submission: Preparation of the budget, electronic submission, etc.

      At the end of the series, participants will:
      1) Discuss the scientific review process including how grants are reviewed and scored
      2) List different type of grant mechanisms and explain the best mechanism to use for specific types of research
      3) Define strategies for the preparation of a successful grant application
      4) List common mistakes made during the grant preparation process
      5) Prepare an accurate budget for an R0-1 type grant application



    Grant Writing Workshop
    Instructors: Gerald B Grunwald, PhD; Carol L Prem; Laurence C Eisenlohr, PhD, VMD; Lorraine Iacovitti, PhD
    Date: 12/2/2014
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      Grant Writing Workshop
      Instructors: Raymond Penn, PhD, Scott Waldman, PhD, Gerald Grunwald, PhD, Lorraine Iacovitti, PhD, Ike Eisenlohr, PhD, and Carol Prem
      Dates: Tuesdays, November 18, November 25, December 2, December 9 and December 16, 2014
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
      Location:
      Maximum Enrollment: 50
      CME credits:

      This five session workshop series, taught by experienced investigators, will help early to mid-career investigators to successfully prepare and submit competitive research proposals. The series is designed to prepare investigators for submission of an NIH type grant. The series will be most helpful to those investigators who are currently in the process of preparing a grant submission and have identified a senior faculty mentor to review components of the grant as they are developed. Session topics include:
      1) Understanding the review process and general strategies for grant preparation
      2) Writing a grant, Part 1: Specific Aims, Significance/Innovation, and Preparing a response to an A0 submission
      3) Writing a grant Part 2: Organization and Development of the Research Strategy
      4) Grant Writing Tips: Grammar/Style/Tone, Successful Strategies, Common Missteps, and Helpful Resources
      5) Nuts and Bolts of grant submission: Preparation of the budget, electronic submission, etc.

      At the end of the series, participants will:
      1) Discuss the scientific review process including how grants are reviewed and scored
      2) List different type of grant mechanisms and explain the best mechanism to use for specific types of research
      3) Define strategies for the preparation of a successful grant application
      4) List common mistakes made during the grant preparation process
      5) Prepare an accurate budget for an R0-1 type grant application



    Grant Writing Workshop
    Instructors: Raymond Penn, PhD; Scott Waldman, M.D., Ph.D; Gerald B Grunwald, PhD; Lorraine Iacovitti, PhD
    Date: 12/9/2014
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      Grant Writing Workshop
      Instructors: Raymond Penn, PhD, Scott Waldman, PhD, Gerald Grunwald, PhD, Lorraine Iacovitti, PhD, Ike Eisenlohr, PhD, and Carol Prem
      Dates: Tuesdays, November 18, November 25, December 2, December 9 and December 16, 2014
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
      Location:
      Maximum Enrollment: 50
      CME credits:

      This five session workshop series, taught by experienced investigators, will help early to mid-career investigators to successfully prepare and submit competitive research proposals. The series is designed to prepare investigators for submission of an NIH type grant. The series will be most helpful to those investigators who are currently in the process of preparing a grant submission and have identified a senior faculty mentor to review components of the grant as they are developed. Session topics include:
      1) Understanding the review process and general strategies for grant preparation
      2) Writing a grant, Part 1: Specific Aims, Significance/Innovation, and Preparing a response to an A0 submission
      3) Writing a grant Part 2: Organization and Development of the Research Strategy
      4) Grant Writing Tips: Grammar/Style/Tone, Successful Strategies, Common Missteps, and Helpful Resources
      5) Nuts and Bolts of grant submission: Preparation of the budget, electronic submission, etc.

      At the end of the series, participants will:
      1) Discuss the scientific review process including how grants are reviewed and scored
      2) List different type of grant mechanisms and explain the best mechanism to use for specific types of research
      3) Define strategies for the preparation of a successful grant application
      4) List common mistakes made during the grant preparation process
      5) Prepare an accurate budget for an R0-1 type grant application



    Grant Writing Workshop
    Instructors: Laurence C Eisenlohr, PhD, VMD; Carol L Prem; Raymond Penn, PhD; Scott Waldman, M.D., Ph.D
    Date: 12/16/2014
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      Grant Writing Workshop
      Instructors: Raymond Penn, PhD, Scott Waldman, PhD, Gerald Grunwald, PhD, Lorraine Iacovitti, PhD, Ike Eisenlohr, PhD, and Carol Prem
      Dates: Tuesdays, November 18, November 25, December 2, December 9 and December 16, 2014
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
      Location:
      Maximum Enrollment: 50
      CME credits:

      This five session workshop series, taught by experienced investigators, will help early to mid-career investigators to successfully prepare and submit competitive research proposals. The series is designed to prepare investigators for submission of an NIH type grant. The series will be most helpful to those investigators who are currently in the process of preparing a grant submission and have identified a senior faculty mentor to review components of the grant as they are developed. Session topics include:
      1) Understanding the review process and general strategies for grant preparation
      2) Writing a grant, Part 1: Specific Aims, Significance/Innovation, and Preparing a response to an A0 submission
      3) Writing a grant Part 2: Organization and Development of the Research Strategy
      4) Grant Writing Tips: Grammar/Style/Tone, Successful Strategies, Common Missteps, and Helpful Resources
      5) Nuts and Bolts of grant submission: Preparation of the budget, electronic submission, etc.

      At the end of the series, participants will:
      1) Discuss the scientific review process including how grants are reviewed and scored
      2) List different type of grant mechanisms and explain the best mechanism to use for specific types of research
      3) Define strategies for the preparation of a successful grant application
      4) List common mistakes made during the grant preparation process
      5) Prepare an accurate budget for an R0-1 type grant application



    The Five Things you need to know before you do Cllinical Research
    Instructors: Walter Kraft, Ph.D.; David Whellan, M.D.
    Date: 1/23/2015
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      The Five Things you need to know before you do Clinical Research
      Instructors: Walter Kraft, MD and David Whellan, MD
      Date: Friday, January 23, 2015
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
      Location: TBD
      Maximum Enrollment: 50
      CME credits: 1.5

      This workshop will review important regulatory requirements and practical knowledge needed to perform research in the clinical setting including: Conflict of Interest and the Sunshine Act, Preparing Budgets, Human Subjects Protection, Intellectual Property, Material Transfer Agreements, and working with grants and contracts.

      At the end of this session, participants will:
      1) Be familiar with the Sunshine Act, be able to obtain information regarding themselves on the internet, and be able to complete conflict of interest forms
      2) Understand medicare coverage analysis (MCA) and how it applies to clinical research
      3) Identify at least 3 common budgeting mistakes
      4) Identify how to navigate the TJU/SKMC clinical research system


    Meet ICE: Jefferson's Interactive Curricula Experience Software
    Instructor: Martha Ankeny, M.Ed
    Date: 2/4/2015
    Time: 1:30pm – 3:00pm
    Location: Scott 306 Macintosh Computer Lab
    (Register for this session)

      Meet ICE: Jefferson’s Interactive Curricula Experience Software
      Instructor: Martha Langley Ankeny, M.Ed. and the ICE Team.
      Date: Wednesday, February 4, 2015
      Time: 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
      Location: Scott 306, Macintosh Computer Lab.
      Maximum Enrollment: 50
      CME credits:

      While clinical practice continues to evolve, pedagogy has not reflected a parallel transformation. Today’s students are comfortable with technology and are expected to use technology in practice. The Interactive Curricular Experience (ICE) is a content management system that facilitates the organization and delivery of Jefferson-developed content for faculty across programs and schools. ICE provides a mechanism to create new learning objects and course content that can be accessed, duplicated or modified by numerous instructors for use in different courses. The courseware is published and then made available to students via iPad, laptop, and desktop computers. Interprofessional faculty teams are creating shared content in several areas, including cultural competence, health literacy, and research.

      ICE will be used to create a TJU Faculty Development-specific module allowing participants to download the free Jefferson App from iTunes onto their iPad prior to the session, and use the module as a learning tool in preparation for the session.

      This technology will enhance learning by increasing experiential learning, enabling interprofessional collaboration, promoting efficiencies across programs leading to reduced redundancy, cost, and resource utilization. ICE will create a learning environment that sparks students' curiosity and encourages exploration and discovery.

      At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

      1) Identify ICE as TJU’s system for facilitating faculty-developed, Jefferson-specific content for iPads
      2) Engage faculty in a modified “flipped classroom” approach to pedagogy using ICE
      3) Originate content for a course and upload it to ICE


    TeamSTEPPS: What's All the Buzz About?
    Instructors: Rachel Sorokin, MD; Elizabeth Speakman, Rn, EdD; Alan Forstater, MD; Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
    Date: 2/4/2015
    Time: 9:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      TeamSTEPPS: What’s All the Buzz About?
      Instructors: Rachel Sorokin, MD, Elizabeth Speakman, RN, EdD, Alan Forstater, MD, Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH, Kate Berg, MD, John Duffy, RN
      Date: Wednesday, February 4, 2015
      Time: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
      Location: 101 BLSB
      Maximum Enrollment: 100
      CME credits:

      Based on twenty years of research and development, the Department of Defense, in collaboration with the Agency for healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), created TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety). TeamSTEPPS is an evidence-based training curriculum designed to improve communication and teamwork skills among healthcare professionals.

      Learners participating in this session will:

      1) Describe what TeamSTEPPS is and how it can be used as an actionable improvement strategy for learners’ respective department and/or unit
      2) Define effective leadership and communication skills, situation monitoring, and mutual support
      3) Identify barriers to teamwork, strategies to overcome teamwork barriers, and potential successful outcomes
      4) Apply TeamSTEPPS concepts to in-class role plays and simulation exercises


    Understanding How Personality Affects Teaching Styles
    Instructor: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
    Date: 2/4/2015
    Time: 1:00pm – 3:00pm
    Location: 101 BLSB
    (Register for this session)

      Understanding How Personality Affects Teaching Styles
      Instructor: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
      Date: Wednesday, February 4, 2015
      Time: 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
      Location: 101 BLSB
      Maximum Enrollment: 100
      CME credits:

      The literature is replete with studies that explain how our students learn. Personality and self-identified learning preferences impact the affective, cognitive, and psychomotor domains of our students’ learning. But do the methods of our instruction, too, play a role in their learning?

      Whether you’re an introvert or an extrovert, or whether you value the ‘big picture’ or pay attention to the details, chances are that your personality influences your pedagogical philosophy and your instructional methodologies. So if we are to be effective with teaching students with a wide range of learning styles, it is essential that we have an awareness of our intrinsic preferences for instruction, and have the comfort to adopt teaching styles that can expand our instructional repertoire.

      Through didactic and hands-on learning activities and discussion, participants in this session will be able to:

      1) Identify and describe their Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator (MBTI)
      2) Discover how one’s MBTI might influence his/her teaching and instructional selections
      3) Explain how a student’s MBTI influences learning outcomes and satisfaction in the classroom
      4) Apply novel instructional strategies in their respective teaching environments that can cater to the learning preferences of a diverse audience


    Conducting Clinical Research: How to navigate the IRB
    Instructor: Walter Kraft, Ph.D.
    Date: 2/13/2015
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      Conducting Clinical Research: How to navigate the IRB
      Instructor: Walter Kraft, MD
      Date: Friday, February 13, 2015
      Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
      Location: TBD
      Maximum Enrollment: 50
      CME credits: 1.0

      This session will focus on the levels of IRB review for quality improvement, chart review, multi-site, or sample research. This session will also review the procedures for doing preliminary review of charts to assess the feasibility of doing a clinical study. Finally, the workshop will explore the role of students/trainees on clinical projects.

      At the end of this session, participants will:
      1) List the levels of review required that define exempt, expedited and full approval
      2) Understand the regulations around creating a research registry
      3) Understand the approval requirements of quality improvement projects