Educator's Toolbox
Curriculum for Educators

    Blackboard Learn: Essentials
    Instructor: Edward Everett
    Date: 8/16/2016
    Time: 8:30am – 10:00am
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, M-13
    (Register for this session)

      Blackboard Learn is the course management system of the entire Jefferson campus. Essentials focuses on the basic features of Blackboard giving faculty the tools to build a course in Blackboard Learn. This session is recommended for all faculty and organizational leaders new to Blackboard.
      After completing the session, participants will be able to:

      1) Describe the function, purpose and access rights to the Content Collection (file management system)
      2) Identify steps to create and deploy Exams & Surveys in Blackboard
      3) Create and maintain a record of assessments in Grade Center
      4) Use Blackboard’s Communication Tools


    Not All Courses are Created Equal: Developing and Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 8/19/2016
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      One of the most prominent fears for faculty and students alike when teaching or taking a fully online course is the perceived lack of social presence in the absence of in-person interactions. Fully online courses that are designed with community-building tasks and activities have resulted in greater student and Facilitator satisfaction and perceived learning (eg., Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000; Richardson & Swan, 2003; Rovai, 2002; Rovai, Ponton & Baker, 2008). This workshop will include discussions and evidence-based materials that will help you think about online teaching and learning with a new lens.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
      • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
      • Name some readily available tools for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions


    Building a Better Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 8/24/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      According to classroom observations and self-report data, instructors rely heavily on lecture as an instructional method despite research documenting the limited effectiveness of lectures as a teaching strategy. Lectures can be integral to the learning experience with an understanding of the factors contributing to its effectiveness as an instructional tool. This workshop will focus on identifying key uses of lecture and three simple strategies for building more effective learning experiences for students. Participants are asked to identify and bring a lecture they have previously developed for use during the experiential workshop.

      Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be to:
      • Identify best uses of lecture
      • Define one organizing technique for lectures
      • Incorporate signposts into a planned lecture experience
      • Apply best practices to a planned lecture experience


    Collaborate—Blackboard’s Virtual Classroom
    Instructor: Edward Everett
    Date: 8/29/2016
    Time: 9:30am – 11:00am
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, M-13
    (Register for this session)

      Collaborate is Blackboard’s virtual learning environment for courses, office hours, or conference calls. With a variety of audio and video communication tools, faculty and learners easily can join a session from almost any device with a wireless connection. Faculty may even use Collaborate to host a guest speaker and other invitees without Jefferson credentials. The browser-based tool fully integrates with Blackboard and enables faculty and learners to share content, demo an application or collaborate in real-time. Faculty can also establish virtual breakout rooms for learners to engage in small groups.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Schedule and launch a Collaborate session
      2) Use audio and video-conference tools to communicate in real time with learners
      3) Use the Collaborate tools to create an interactive classroom experience for distance and hybrid courses


    Universal Design (UD) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL): What Are They and How Do They Impact My Students?
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 8/31/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      UDL and UD are terms that are often used interchangeably but they are different in several ways. Universal Design for Learning is “a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn” (Rose & Meyer, 1984). Universal Design refers to what we must do by law to ensure physical access to buildings and spaces for individuals with disabilities. This session will include discussions and information on UDL and UD and specific methods for implementing the principles of UDL in our teaching.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Differentiate between the terms Universal Design for Learning and Universal Design
      • Describe ways in which UD may be applicable in their classrooms, buildings or community
      • Describe several ways in which the principles of UDL may be applied in one or more of their courses


    ExamSoft Basics
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 9/8/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, M-13A
    (Register for this session)

      ExamSoft is a web-based solution that supports the entire testing process including exam creation, administration, secure delivery, scoring, and analysis. This workshop focuses on the mechanics of creating and posting exams. It is essential for anyone using the product including Administrative Assistants, Faculty and Course Coordinators.

      Topics will include:

      1) Navigating the interface
      2) Adding/Importing questions
      3) Creating and posting exams


    Assessment Essentials
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 9/13/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      As health care professionals, each of us embraces the concept of assessment, so much so that Physical Assessment is often given its own course in a curriculum. This one-hour workshop may serve as a primer and/or a refresher on the most basic concepts in educational assessment.

      Topics include:
      • Formative vs. Summative Assessment
      • Bloom’s Taxonomy and performance domains
      • Reliability, Validity and Assessment Statistics
      • Policies and a Systematic Approach


    Curriculum 101: Lesson 1 – Preparing for a New Curriculum
    Instructor:  
    Date: 9/16/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Eakins Lounge
    (Register for this session)

      Lesson 1 will be all about preparing students and faculty for a new curriculum, and helping involved stakeholders understand the rational for change. Students will need to be prepared on the expectations for their performance and how their learning will be linked to the workforce. Similarly, curriculum designers will need to anticipate faculty resistance throughout the change process.
      The session will create a dialogue on how curriculum designers can equip themselves with the tools to better prepare students and faculty, as well as themselves for the challenges that may lie ahead. The importance of defining and effectively conveying the rationale for curricular change will be discussed. Time will also be spent on options for effective faculty development.
      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Discuss the importance of planning a curriculum
      2) Identify methods to engage faculty in the planning stages and anticipate resistance to change
      3) Determine how to effectively prepare students for a curriculum they may never have previously experienced
      4) Relate the importance of curricular change to meet the needs of a changing learner and a changing workplace


    Curriculum 101: Lesson 2 – Curricular Frameworks
    Instructor:  
    Date: 9/16/2016
    Time: 11:00am – 1:00pm
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Eakins Lounge
    (Register for this session)

      The focus of Lesson 2 will be on better developing curricula that will offer the opportunities to collaborate across Colleges, as well as identify common learning themes across Colleges. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about the different curricular models to choose from (i.e., competency-based, problem-based, concept-based models). An additional goal of the session will be on how to better assist faculty in adapting to a new curriculum by equipping them to teach in a variety of formats.

      The Jefferson College of Nursing (CON) will be used a case study. The CON recently completed its curriculum revision. The new curriculum is built on four themes (i.e., interprofessional collaboration, practice excellence, population, and innovation), and included twenty-five concepts across these themes. Faculty leaders in the CON have developed a compendium of lessons learned during the school’s curriculum revision process; this will be shared and discussed with learners participating in the session.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Discuss the importance of effectively organizing content for inclusion in a curriculum
      2) Introduce various curricular models that faculty leaders and curriculum designers can choose from
      3) Define conceptual learning and identify the steps needed to develop a conceptual outline
      4) Determine which concepts are essential for inclusion in a new curriculum
      5) Apply lessons learned from the CON to future curriculum design


    Curriculum 101: Lesson 3 – Strategy, Outcomes, and Alignment
    Instructor:  
    Date: 9/16/2016
    Time: 1:00pm – 3:00pm
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Eakins Lounge
    (Register for this session)

      The focus of Lesson 3 will be on developing an outcomes-oriented curriculum that matches the mission of the school and the intention of the program. The overarching goal of aligning the new curriculum with the core values of the institutions will be highlighted. Time will be spent on discerning what should be the learners’ outcomes throughout the curriculum design process.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify the mission and core values of a school and/or program early in the curriculum design process
      2) Determine what should be the learners’ outcomes of a new curriculum
      3) Summarize the role of learning outcomes and curriculum maps when designing a new curriculum
      4) Relate the importance of learners’ milestones and competencies
      5) Develop strategies to assist faculty members with recognizing outcomes in learners


    Curriculum 101: Lesson 4 – Assessment in a New Curriculum
    Instructor:  
    Date: 9/16/2016
    Time: 3:00pm – 5:00pm
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Eakins Lounge
    (Register for this session)

      Do the assessments match what is being taught? What are the performance benchmarks for students? Was instruction successful? What does success even look like?

      Assessments should reveal how well learners have learned what was intended for them to learn. For this to occur, assessments, learning objectives, and instructional strategies need to be closely aligned so that they continuously reinforce one another. During Lesson 4, the final installation of the workshop, the focus will be placed on understanding the importance of linking assessments with learning objectives and learning outcomes. Participants will even have a chance to explore creative approaches to assessment methodologies.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Recognize the role of learning objectives in deciding what knowledge and skills to assess
      2) Discuss the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor considerations of assessment
      3) Explore a range of assessment methods for skills assessment
      4) Choose appropriate performance benchmarks for learners

      * Dr. Teresa Chan is an emergency physician, base hospital physician, and clinician educator in Hamilton, ON. Since 2014, she has also been the Continuing Professional Development Director for the Division of Emergency Medicine at McMaster University. With regards to residency education, she is the McMaster Royal College Residency Program's Director of Assessment, working to create a competency-based, medical education, workplace-based assessment program (McMAP). Nationally, she has held positions with the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine as the Journal’s inaugural Social Media Editor. She is also a well-published researcher and innovator, working with numerous online groups (e.g.www.aliem.com, www.canadiem.org) to advance medical education in new and exciting ways.

      Dr. Chan completed her undergraduate work at the University of Toronto, and subsequently received her medical degree from the University of Western Ontario. Most recently, she completed a Masters of Health Professions in Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Chan has given numerous national speaking engagements on medical education, simulation, social media in teaching and learning, and academic productivity in academia.


    Teaching and Supporting International Students and Other ESL Learners
    Instructor: James  Dyksen, MSEd-TESOL
    Date: 9/20/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      International students and other students for whom English is a second language face a unique set of challenges and issues as they adjust to study in the degree programs at Jefferson, and, in many cases, to living in the US for the first time. This workshop will elicit faculty experiences teaching and working with ESL learners, including both concerns and effective strategies. The workshop is designed to develop awareness of the needs of international students and other ESL learners in Jefferson programs and classes, to discuss teaching, curriculum design and communication strategies that may help such students, and to identify resources across campus that may aid International and ESL learners with coursework and / or other areas of need.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the unique needs of international students and other ESL learners
      • Develop strategies for addressing the needs or concerns of international students and other ESL learners
      • Apply these alternative strategies to the learning environment
      • Identify available campus resources to support international students and other ESL learners


    Improving Assessment with ExamSoft
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 9/22/2016
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      ExamSoft is not just a secure delivery solution – it has the potential to improve teaching and learning exponentially! This workshop, which focuses on the feedback and analysis features of ExamSoft, is essential for item writers, course faculty, and administration.

      Topics will include:

      1) Student Feedback reports
      2) Self-directed learning
      3) Early advising/remediation
      4) Item analysis
      5) Curricular goals and objectives


    Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 9/26/2016
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      The Center for Teaching & Learning presents iCE: interactive Curricula Experience Platform & App. A web-based platform and iPad app, iCE delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

      Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

      This new learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university. Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops.The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.
      In this workshop, participants will:

      1) Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video, and other course artifacts)
      2) Organize Objects into Topics
      3) Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
      4) Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course


    Rubrics: Improve Your Grading Efficiency and Reliability
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 9/28/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      For years faculty have used rubrics to grade their written assignments. Now, Blackboard allows you to associate scoring rubrics for both your assignments and discussion boards. If you’re not convinced of the value of rubrics, come to this workshop to see how scoring rubrics can improve your grading efficiency and reliability.

      Topics will include:

      1) What is a scoring rubric and why should I use one?
      2) How to create, copy and edit a rubric?
      3) How to associate a rubric with assignments and discussions?
      4) How to import and export rubrics?
      5) How to grade with rubrics?


    Mobile Presenting Tips & Tricks
    Instructors: Kathleen Day, MS; Sean Dyer
    Date: 10/6/2016
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 306
    (Register for this session)

      Sharing images, video and other content on the fly is becoming easier and easier to do with consumer tools, and select campus classrooms have been equipped with AppleTV to help this real-time sharing. This workshop will demonstrate various tools and techniques for sharing with a mobile or personal device in real time and introduce participants to more advanced tools that can be used for sharing screen recordings.

      Topics will include:

      • AirDisplay
      • AirPlay (for projection)
      • Reflector (for Screen Recording)
      • QuickTime (for Screen Recording)

      Please note: most of these tools are Apple OS based and may not be available on the Windows platform.


    Electronic Portfolios for Academic Programs and Career Success
    Instructor: Anthony J Frisby, PhD
    Date: 10/10/2016
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The fields of art, architecture and engineering have long used portfolio’s as a way for both students – and professionals – to show case their work. Not unexpectedly, these physical portfolios have found their way onto the digital world and are often called e-portfolios. Whether physical or electronic this tool for show casing a person’s skills and experience is valuable. Both to the learner as evidence of their accomplishments and as a tool to help them stand out as a better candidate in the hiring process. Portfolios can also play an important role in the professional development of a student. Specific course projects that meet academic objectives can be reflected on, solidifying the students understanding of concepts and the skills they’ve mastered.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
      • Identify how portfolios can be used in the academic program to track student progress and mastery of skills
      • Observe a demonstration of sample portfolios in Jefferson’s portfolio product, Portfoliu
      • Identify which assignments in your course would be appropriate for showcasing student achievement in a portfolio


    To Record or Not to Record: A Session on When, Why and How to Integrate Video Content
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 10/18/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this session)

      Understanding the student benefits of instructor-recorded video content will be discussed. Equally as important is the understanding of when to do so – just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. During this session, we will also explore tools that are user-friendly and freely available for use in our courses.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the benefits of instructor-recorded video content
      • Describe ways in which video content may be effectively integrated into their course
      • Identify several user-friendly and freely available video tools
      • Develop a plan for at least one instructor-recorded video for the current or future semester


    Nearpod Audience Response System
    Instructor: Edward Everett
    Date: 10/25/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      Nearpod is the CTL’s new audience response system that allows instructors to share content and assessments in real time with students using their personal and mobile devices. Push quizzes, polls, videos, web links, slide shows, and homework to your students easily in a manner and appealing multi-media platform that keeps students engaged and active.
      Participants will learn how to:

      1) Create a Nearpod slideshow
      2) Add activity slides such as Quizzes/Polls
      3) Collect and analyze Nearpod data
      4) Deploy a Nearpod for synchronous (live) or asynchronous (homework) sessions


    Introduction to a Novel Method for Educational Scholarship Dissemination: MedEDPortal
    Instructor: Nethra Ankam, MD
    Date: 10/27/2016
    Time: 8:00am – 9:00am
    Location: Hamilton Building, Room 208/209
    (Register for this session)

      MedEdPORTAL Publications is a free publication service provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in partnership with the American Dental Education Association. MedEDPORTAL Publications maintains a rigorous peer review process based on standards used in the scholarly publishing community. MedEdPORTAL offers educators tutorials, virtual patients, simulation cases, lab guides, video podcasts, assessment tools, and other resources to

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify MedEdPORTAL’s suite of services (Publications, iCollaborative, CE Directory)
      2) Describe submission standards and posting processes for MedEdPORTAL
      3) Review and discuss educational tools pertaining to MedEdPORTAL submissions
      4) Demonstrate navigating MedEdPORTAL’s live site


    Just In Time Low-Stakes Formative Assessments: Tips and Strategies to Inform Instruction
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 11/1/2016
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      In this workshop, we will discuss and practice using evidence-based strategies for assessing student understanding of the content throughout the semester. This ‘just in time’ data provides ongoing feedback used by instructors to adjust their teaching to improve student outcomes. Formative assessments are also designed to help students identify their strengths and areas in need of more targeted work prior to taking high-stakes exams and other assessments. Formative assessments need not be time consuming to create or to deliver and analyze.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Understand the purposes of and differences between formative and summative assessments
      • Describe multiple formative assessment options for use in their courses
      • Create at least one formative assessment for immediate use in one or more courses


    Blackboard Learn: Grade Center
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 11/3/2016
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      Do you write exactly 50 test questions so they can each be worth 2 points? Does the Blackboard Grade Center make you uncomfortable? Attend this workshop to improve your comfort level and learn a few new features that have the potential to save you lots of time.

      Topics will include:

      1) Overview of the Grade Center
      2) Create calculated/weighted columns
      3) How to exempt grades
      4) How to automatically re-grade an exam
      5) How to use Grade Schema to report letter grades


    Generational Cohorts in the Work Setting and Classroom: Understanding Differences and Maximizing Strengths
    Instructors: Mary Bouchaud, PhD, MSN, CNS, RN, CRRN; Mary Hanson-Zalot, EdD(c), MSN, RN, AOCN; Jeffrey Stevens, MSILR
    Date: 11/4/2016
    Time: 7:30am – 9:00am
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 207
    (Register for this session)

      The workforce and student body that comprise the Jefferson community consist of members from diverse generational cohorts. Examining the tendencies, characteristics, and preferences of our colleagues and students from these different generations provides insight into some striking differences between them, as well as some shared commonalities. This session will describe the challenges and opportunities created when generational diversity is appreciated. We will use both a Human Resource and Academic lens to share observations regarding cohorts working together and shaping the work environment – be it a patient care area or classroom setting. The ability to choreograph teams composed of members from representative generational cohorts adds to the value of our work.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Describe characteristics and preferences of generational cohort that constitute Jefferson’s workforce and student populations
      2) Discuss how generational differences among members of the workforce influence institutional culture
      3) Explain how generational diversity can positively impact health care delivery


    From Rough Draft to Publication: A Workshop on Developing your Educational Projects for Publication onto MedEdPORTAL
    Instructor: Nethra Ankam, MD
    Date: 11/10/2016
    Time: 8:00am – 9:00am
    Location: Hamilton Building, Room 201
    (Register for this session)

      This workshop will introduce strategies to help faculty develop their current educational activities, ideas, and programs into scholarly projects for potential publication onto the AAMC’s MedEdPORTAL. Participants will be asked to bring their rough drafts (the educational content they would like to see to publication) to the workshop, where they will apply the processes for successful development into scholarly work. Participants will work through real-life examples that will facilitate understanding the processes of clearing a publication from a copyright standpoint, as well as creating an instructor’s guide. Registration will be limited to only 10 participants.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify MedEDPortal and distinguish its role in creating an open exchange of health education teaching and assessment resources
      2) Describe the MedEdPORTAL’s rigorous peer-review processes for successful publication
      3) Develop a plan for turning current educational content into educational scholarship
      4) Apply processes and strategies for publication to their own work


    Building Interactives in iCE: Advanced iCE Skills Workshop
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 11/14/2016
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      Registration is limited to participants who have previously contributed learning modules the content management system.

      This is an advanced technological workshop on building interactive learning objects in iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience).

      Course developers can create two different types of interactive features in iCE: Hotspots and Timelines. Hotspots allow learners to interact with a learning object and receive feedback in real time--think identifying anomalies on an ECG or identifying key structures in a brain scan. Timelines typically present information in a linear fashion such as the stages of fetal development or key moments in the development of occupational therapy as a profession. Timelines may also be used to describe a process such as the key steps in developing a public health message or pre-surgery routines. This workshop instructs learners on key questions and considerations to jumpstart interactive development for the iCE platform. Participants will be guided through the process for building Hotspots and Timelines in this experiential workshop.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify a potential Hotspot in the learner’s discipline
      2) Identify a potential Timeline in the learner’s discipline
      3) Describe two key differences between interactives and learning objects in iCE
      4) Create an interactive for the iCE platform


    Clinical Behavior: Evaluating a Student’s Professionalism
    Instructors: Andrea Joseph, MS, RPh; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 11/16/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      Many health care accreditation organizations require that programs not only foster professionalism, but also demonstrate that graduates possess these qualities. The evaluation of values, affect and communication skill is significantly more difficult than the evaluation of cognition or psychomotor skill. If evaluating professionalism troubles you, this one-hour workshop should being to ease your discomfort.

      Topics include:
      • Validity of Measurement in the Affective Domain
      • Strategies to Improve Reliability of Affective Domain Assessment Instruments
      • Formative and Summative Evaluations of Professionalism


    Assessing the Skillful (or not-so Skillful) Practitioner
    Instructors: Katherine Berg, MD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 11/29/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The psychomotor domain is by far the most resource intensive of the three (cognitive, affective, psychomotor) domains to measure. This one-hour workshop will explore the difficulties associated with evaluating skill performance and strategies to overcome these obstacles.

      Topics include:
      • Validity of Measurement in the Psychomotor Domain
      • Skill Acquisition, Scaffolding and the Assessment Cycle
      • Strategies to Reliably Recognize the Skillful Practicioner


    Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 12/6/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      The Center for Teaching & Learning presents iCE: interactive Curricula Experience Platform & App. A web-based platform and iPad app, iCE delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

      Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

      This new learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university. Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops.The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.
      In this workshop, participants will:

      1) Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video, and other course artifacts)
      2) Organize Objects into Topics
      3) Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
      4) Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course


    Introduction to Adult Learning and its Application to the Health Professions
    Instructors: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH; Kathryn Shaffer, EdD, RN
    Date: 12/14/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      Active learning has received considerable attention over the past several years. It is defined as any instructional method that engages learners in the learning process, requiring learners to partake in meaningful learning activities and think about what they are doing. Active learning has the potential to promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of course content.

      This session will challenge some commonly held assumptions about learning, and discuss some of the research in the area of cognitive psychology, education, and physiology that hold direct implications for teaching in the health professions. In addition, a number of easily adaptable classroom activities will be used during the session.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Describe theoretical principles to teaching students in the health professions
      2) Define adult learning; active learning; and passive learning
      3) Identify various instructional styles to achieve effective learning outcomes for learners in the health professions


    Teaching with iCE: Too Cool for School
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 12/16/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) Platform & App, a locally-developed content management system, literally places the learning experience at the student’s fingertips. The platform encourages course developers to re-think the organization and presentation of learning materials based on how they wish the learner to engage with the course content. During the session, a sample module with related topics will be deconstructed for participants. Content developers will describe the organization of at least one topic from two perspectives—the pedagogical and the visual. Templates used to create individual topics will be shared with participants to make the design process transparent. The facilitator will describe best practices in course design and development throughout the workshop, including the importance of a consistency in creating and delivering content, the benefits of multiple kinds of learning objects, and the ability for learners to interact with course materials.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
      • Describe three course design principles
      • Identify key characteristics of the iCE platform
      • Apply the iCE template to a topic


    Blackboard Learn: Essentials
    Instructor: Edward Everett
    Date: 1/4/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      Blackboard Learn is the course management system of the entire Jefferson campus. Essentials focuses on the basic features of Blackboard giving faculty the tools to build a course in Blackboard Learn. This session is recommended for all faculty and organizational leaders new to Blackboard.
      After completing the session, participants will be able to:

      1) Describe the function, purpose and access rights to the Content Collection (file management system)
      2) Identify steps to create and deploy Exams & Surveys in Blackboard
      3) Create and maintain a record of assessments in Grade Center
      4) Use Blackboard’s Communication Tools


    Not All Courses are Created Equal: Developing and Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 1/6/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      One of the most prominent fears for faculty and students alike when teaching or taking a fully online course is the perceived lack of social presence in the absence of in-person interactions. Fully online courses that are designed with community-building tasks and activities have resulted in greater student and Facilitator satisfaction and perceived learning (eg., Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000; Richardson & Swan, 2003; Rovai, 2002; Rovai, Ponton & Baker, 2008). This workshop will include discussions and evidence-based materials that will help you think about online teaching and learning with a new lens.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
      • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
      • Name some readily available tools for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions


    ExamSoft Basics
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 1/11/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      ExamSoft is a web-based solution that supports the entire testing process including exam creation, administration, secure delivery, scoring, and analysis. This workshop focuses on the mechanics of creating and posting exams. It is essential for anyone using the product including Administrative Assistants, Faculty and Course Coordinators.

      Topics will include:

      1) Navigating the interface
      2) Adding/Importing questions
      3) Creating and posting exams


    Teaching and Supporting International Students and Other ESL Learners
    Instructor: James  Dyksen, MSEd-TESOL
    Date: 1/18/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      International students and other students for whom English is a second language face a unique set of challenges and issues as they adjust to study in the degree programs at Jefferson, and, in many cases, to living in the US for the first time. This workshop will elicit faculty experiences teaching and working with ESL learners, including both concerns and effective strategies. The workshop is designed to develop awareness of the needs of international students and other ESL learners in Jefferson programs and classes, to discuss teaching, curriculum design and communication strategies that may help such students, and to identify resources across campus that may aid International and ESL learners with coursework and / or other areas of need.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the unique needs of international students and other ESL learners
      • Develop strategies for addressing the needs or concerns of international students and other ESL learners
      • Apply these alternative strategies to the learning environment
      • Identify available campus resources to support international students and other ESL learners


    Building a Better Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 1/20/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      According to classroom observations and self-report data, instructors rely heavily on lecture as an instructional method despite research documenting the limited effectiveness of lectures as a teaching strategy. Lectures can be integral to the learning experience with an understanding of the factors contributing to its effectiveness as an instructional tool. This workshop will focus on identifying key uses of lecture and three simple strategies for building more effective learning experiences for students. Participants are asked to identify and bring a lecture they have previously developed for use during the experiential workshop.

      Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be to:
      • Identify best uses of lecture
      • Define one organizing technique for lectures
      • Incorporate signposts into a planned lecture experience
      • Apply best practices to a planned lecture experience


    Collaborate—Blackboard’s Virtual Classroom
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 1/23/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:30pm
    Location: Jefferson Alumni Hall, M-13
    (Register for this session)

      Collaborate is Blackboard’s virtual learning environment for courses, office hours, or conference calls. With a variety of audio and video communication tools, faculty and learners easily can join a session from almost any device with a wireless connection. Faculty may even use Collaborate to host a guest speaker and other invitees without Jefferson credentials. The browser-based tool fully integrates with Blackboard and enables faculty and learners to share content, demo an application or collaborate in real-time. Faculty can also establish virtual breakout rooms for learners to engage in small groups.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Schedule and launch a Collaborate session
      2) Use audio and video-conference tools to communicate in real time with learners
      3) Use the Collaborate tools to create an interactive classroom experience for distance and hybrid courses


    Improving Assessment with ExamSoft
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 1/25/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      ExamSoft is not just a secure delivery solution – it has the potential to improve teaching and learning exponentially! This workshop, which focuses on the feedback and analysis features of ExamSoft, is essential for item writers, course faculty, and administration.

      Topics will include:

      1) Student Feedback reports
      2) Self-directed learning
      3) Early advising/remediation
      4) Item analysis
      5) Curricular goals and objectives


    Universal Design (UD) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL): What Are They and How Do They Impact My Students?
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 1/31/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      UDL and UD are terms that are often used interchangeably but they are different in several ways. Universal Design for Learning is “a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn” (Rose & Meyer, 1984). Universal Design refers to what we must do by law to ensure physical access to buildings and spaces for individuals with disabilities. This session will include discussions and information on UDL and UD and specific methods for implementing the principles of UDL in our teaching.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Differentiate between the terms Universal Design for Learning and Universal Design
      • Describe ways in which UD may be applicable in their classrooms, buildings or community
      • Describe several ways in which the principles of UDL may be applied in one or more of their courses


    Active Teaching, Engaging Minds
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 2/3/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      Active teaching is an umbrella term used to identify a variety of teaching strategies. It includes most anything that students do in a classroom other than passively listening to an instructor’s lecture. Research demonstrates active learning improves students' understanding and retention of information and can be very effective in developing higher order cognitive skills such as problem solving and critical thinking. Active learning, however, presents challenges and requires re-thinking the classroom space and traditional roles.

      This interactive workshop will:
      • summarize the impact of active teaching on student learning
      • demonstrate a handful of active teaching strategies
      • discuss some challenges to adopting active teaching techniques


    Assessment Essentials
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 2/7/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      As health care professionals, each of us embraces the concept of assessment, so much so that Physical Assessment is often given its own course in a curriculum. This one-hour workshop may serve as a primer and/or a refresher on the most basic concepts in educational assessment.

      Topics include:
      • Formative vs. Summative Assessment
      • Bloom’s Taxonomy and performance domains
      • Reliability, Validity and Assessment Statistics
      • Policies and a Systematic Approach


    Embracing Glossophobia: Learning to Communicate with Confidence
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 2/10/2017
    Time: 3:00pm – 4:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      Perhaps no tool in the professional toolbox has been as feared as public speaking. However, professional advancement is often tied to one’s ability to successfully present information at a meeting, a professional conference or even within the classroom.
      To excel in a professional context, you must be able to communicate in a number of different contexts and with a wide number of audiences. This interactive session provides a framework for re-thinking personal communication habits and techniques to assist you with your next communication interaction.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
      • Define communication apprehension
      • Describe the four common contexts for communication
      • Recognize potential triggers for communication anxiety
      • Identify at least one stress reduction technique for communication interactions


    Mobile Presenting Tips & Tricks
    Instructors: Kathleen Day, MS; Sean Dyer
    Date: 2/15/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 306
    (Register for this session)

      Sharing images, video and other content on the fly is becoming easier and easier to do with consumer tools, and select campus classrooms have been equipped with AppleTV to help this real-time sharing. This workshop will demonstrate various tools and techniques for sharing with a mobile or personal device in real time and introduce participants to more advanced tools that can be used for sharing screen recordings.

      Topics will include:

      • AirDisplay
      • AirPlay (for projection)
      • Reflector (for Screen Recording)
      • QuickTime (for Screen Recording)

      Please note: most of these tools are Apple OS based and may not be available on the Windows platform.


    Rubrics: Improve Your Grading Efficiency and Reliability
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 2/21/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      For years faculty have used rubrics to grade their written assignments. Now, Blackboard allows you to associate scoring rubrics for both your assignments and discussion boards. If you’re not convinced of the value of rubrics, come to this workshop to see how scoring rubrics can improve your grading efficiency and reliability.

      Topics will include:

      1) What is a scoring rubric and why should I use one?
      2) How to create, copy and edit a rubric?
      3) How to associate a rubric with assignments and discussions?
      4) How to import and export rubrics?
      5) How to grade with rubrics?


    Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 2/23/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      The Center for Teaching & Learning presents iCE: interactive Curricula Experience Platform & App. A web-based platform and iPad app, iCE delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

      Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

      This new learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university. Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops.The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.
      In this workshop, participants will:

      1) Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video, and other course artifacts)
      2) Organize Objects into Topics
      3) Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
      4) Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course


    Building Interactives in iCE: Advanced iCE Skills Workshop
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 3/3/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      Registration is limited to participants who have previously contributed learning modules the content management system.

      This is an advanced technological workshop on building interactive learning objects in iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience).

      Course developers can create two different types of interactive features in iCE: Hotspots and Timelines. Hotspots allow learners to interact with a learning object and receive feedback in real time--think identifying anomalies on an ECG or identifying key structures in a brain scan. Timelines typically present information in a linear fashion such as the stages of fetal development or key moments in the development of occupational therapy as a profession. Timelines may also be used to describe a process such as the key steps in developing a public health message or pre-surgery routines. This workshop instructs learners on key questions and considerations to jumpstart interactive development for the iCE platform. Participants will be guided through the process for building Hotspots and Timelines in this experiential workshop.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify a potential Hotspot in the learner’s discipline
      2) Identify a potential Timeline in the learner’s discipline
      3) Describe two key differences between interactives and learning objects in iCE
      4) Create an interactive for the iCE platform


    To Record or Not to Record: A Session on When, Why and How to Integrate Video Content
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 3/15/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this session)

      Understanding the student benefits of instructor-recorded video content will be discussed. Equally as important is the understanding of when to do so – just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. During this session, we will also explore tools that are user-friendly and freely available for use in our courses.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the benefits of instructor-recorded video content
      • Describe ways in which video content may be effectively integrated into their course
      • Identify several user-friendly and freely available video tools
      • Develop a plan for at least one instructor-recorded video for the current or future semester


    The Active Learning Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 3/20/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The large lecture presents a number of challenges to experienced and novice instructors alike. This workshop explores some of the challenges (and assumptions we make about what can or cannot happen in a large lecture) and describes a number of techniques to assist faculty transition from the “sage on the stage” to a “guide on the side.”

      This interactive workshop will:
      • describe benefits and challenges associated with a traditional lecture model
      • explore instructor and student assumptions about large enrollment courses
      • identify potential engaged learning activities for the large lecture courses
      • demonstrate a handful of techniques to enhance large lecture courses


    Just In Time Low-Stakes Formative Assessments: Tips and Strategies to Inform Instruction
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 3/28/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      In this workshop, we will discuss and practice using evidence-based strategies for assessing student understanding of the content throughout the semester. This ‘just in time’ data provides ongoing feedback used by instructors to adjust their teaching to improve student outcomes. Formative assessments are also designed to help students identify their strengths and areas in need of more targeted work prior to taking high-stakes exams and other assessments. Formative assessments need not be time consuming to create or to deliver and analyze.

      At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Understand the purposes of and differences between formative and summative assessments
      • Describe multiple formative assessment options for use in their courses
      • Create at least one formative assessment for immediate use in one or more courses


    Blackboard Learn: Grade Center
    Instructor:  
    Date: 3/31/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307
    (Register for this session)

      Do you write exactly 50 test questions so they can each be worth 2 points? Does the Blackboard Grade Center make you uncomfortable? Attend this workshop to improve your comfort level and learn a few new features that have the potential to save you lots of time.

      Topics will include:

      1) Overview of the Grade Center
      2) Create calculated/weighted columns
      3) How to exempt grades
      4) How to automatically re-grade an exam
      5) How to use Grade Schema to report letter grades


    Clinical Behavior: Evaluating a Student’s Professionalism
    Instructors: Andrea Joseph, MS, RPh; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 4/5/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      Many health care accreditation organizations require that programs not only foster professionalism, but also demonstrate that graduates possess these qualities. The evaluation of values, affect and communication skill is significantly more difficult than the evaluation of cognition or psychomotor skill. If evaluating professionalism troubles you, this one-hour workshop should being to ease your discomfort.

      Topics include:
      • Validity of Measurement in the Affective Domain
      • Strategies to Improve Reliability of Affective Domain Assessment Instruments
      • Formative and Summative Evaluations of Professionalism


    Electronic Portfolios for Academic Programs and Career Success
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 4/28/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The fields of art, architecture and engineering have long used portfolio’s as a way for both students – and professionals – to show case their work. Not unexpectedly, these physical portfolios have found their way onto the digital world and are often called e-portfolios. Whether physical or electronic this tool for show casing a person’s skills and experience is valuable. Both to the learner as evidence of their accomplishments and as a tool to help them stand out as a better candidate in the hiring process. Portfolios can also play an important role in the professional development of a student. Specific course projects that meet academic objectives can be reflected on, solidifying the students understanding of concepts and the skills they’ve mastered.

      Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
      • Identify how portfolios can be used in the academic program to track student progress and mastery of skills
      • Observe a demonstration of sample portfolios in Jefferson’s portfolio product, Portfoliu
      • Identify which assignments in your course would be appropriate for showcasing student achievement in a portfolio


    Essentials of Mentorship
    Instructor: Anthony Donato, MD
    Date: 4/28/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 11:00am
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      As academic medicine struggles to adopt outcomes-based medical education paradigms while battling productivity pressures and record levels of physician burnout, the relationships between faculty members and their trainees are more important than ever. This perfect storm, however, threatens the key ingredient that was the backbone of residency training from its outset – the apprenticeship model, in which mentors guided the younger generation through their important career, as well as home and life decisions.
      This workshop will review qualities of effective mentors, as well as review the best of innovations published in the GME literature that promote and invigorate mentor-mentee relationships. Participants will review the emerging literature on professional identity formation, and will exchange ideas to invigorate their department’s mentoring programs.

      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Identify characteristics of effective mentors
      2) Define the concept of professional identify formation, and apply it to their own experience as a physician
      3) List two feasible and sustainable programmatic interventions to improve their own mentoring programs

      * Dr. Donato completed his undergraduate work at Georgetown University and Medical School at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine on a scholarship program with the United States Air Force. Following completion of an Air Force Internal Medicine residency and teaching military residents and students as a Clerkship Director for Uniformed Services University, he joined the Reading Hospital Internal Medicine Faculty in 2001. He continued his pursuit of improving his teaching skills with his completion of a General Internal Medicine Fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2005, and completed a Masters of Health Professions Education program through the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2012. His professional interests involve direct observation techniques and deepening apprenticeship models of resident development through innovative educational techniques. He currently serves as Associate Program Director of Internal Medicine, teaches residents on the inpatient wards, and is a Professor of Medicine at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University.


    Teaching in an Age of Medical Uncertainty
    Instructor: Gretchen Diemer, MD
    Date: 4/28/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      With an increasing focus on High Value Care in medical education, this seminar exposes how coping with uncertainty is critical to faculty and learners at all levels of education. Recognizing uncertainty in ourselves and understanding how testing or treatments are likely to help address uncertainty and explicitly discussing this with our learners is the best way to combat a hidden curriculum that is very intolerant of uncertainty. We will review the concept of uncertainty and discuss ways to personally cope with uncertainty and how to teach our learners to cope with it.
      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Recognize how uncertainty is ubiquitous in the practice of medicine
      2) Practice techniques to deal with their own uncertainty for their learners via role modeling exercises
      3) Discuss how the search for certainty may impact the value of care delivered to patients


    Teaching your Residents to Teach: An Immersive Workshop
    Instructors: Gretchen Diemer, MD; Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH; Abigail Wolf, MD
    Date: 4/28/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 3:30pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      Regardless of discipline or specialty training, a significant portion of residents’ responsibilities involves teaching and evaluating medical students and interns. Few of them, if any, however, have had formalized training in educational theory. In the face of Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, graduate medical education programs must be able to deliver instructional programs to their housestaff on effective teaching principles.
      This interactive workshop will provide an overview of the core educational skills residents will need to succeed as teachers of both medical students and interns. These will include principles of adult learning theory; effective feedback skills; appropriate coaching methods during procedural instruction; evaluation tools; and modeling tips for clinical decision-making. Workshop instructors will review these skills, and will facilitate a forum where participants will share and collaboratively design methods and curricular elements to develop instructional sessions for their residents at their respective institutions.
      At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

      1) Review essential components of a curriculum that will prepare residents to be effective teachers of interns and students (i.e., learning styles and preferences, adult learning theory, procedural learning, feedback and evaluation, clinical decision-making).
      2) Apply pedagogical principles to design an instructional session for their own residents at their respective programs and departments (i.e., one-hour, three-hour, or half-day formats).
      3) Develop a [specialty-neutral] instructional curriculum for residents that directly links to ACGME milestones (i.e., PC, SBP, ICS) Milestones


    Assessing the Skillful (or not-so Skillful) Practitioner
    Instructors: Katherine Berg, MD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 5/2/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this session)

      The psychomotor domain is by far the most resource intensive of the three (cognitive, affective, psychomotor) domains to measure. This one-hour workshop will explore the difficulties associated with evaluating skill performance and strategies to overcome these obstacles.

      Topics include:
      • Validity of Measurement in the Psychomotor Domain
      • Skill Acquisition, Scaffolding and the Assessment Cycle
      • Strategies to Reliably Recognize the Skillful Practicioner


    Improve Your Bedside Teaching: Tips to Facilitate the Instruction of Different Learners in the Clinical Learning Environment
    Instructor: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
    Date: 5/4/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: TBD
    (Register for this session)

      We have all experienced the challenges of teaching in the clinical learning environment (CLE). Whether dealing with time constraints, patient satisfaction scores, clinical efficiency, or precepting learners at varied levels of training, being an effective bedside teacher is not an easy feat. This workshop will facilitate a discussion on which practices will assist us in providing the highest quality patient care in the midst of teaching learners in the CLE.

      At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

      1) Define the benefits of effective bedside teaching
      2) Identify challenges to teaching at the bedside
      3) Describe various modalities to teach learners at different stages of training at the bedside
      4) Utilize the experience of the patient and family during the teaching session